How Long Does Fishing Line Last?

If you are a new fisherman, a question may come to your mind: how long does fishing line last? If you ask this question to a seasoned angler, he too will be unable to give a clear answer to this question. It is because there is no set of rules or criteria that help someone to figure out the lifespan of a fishing line. The longevity of a fishing line depends on several factors like the type of fishing line one is using, the materials from which the line is manufactured, and the proper maintenance of the line. Let’s discuss these factors in detail.

How Long Does Fishing Line Last? 

Fishing carp reel close-up on the background of water and fishing rods in a bright Sunny day. Background.

Factors That Determine the Longevity of a Fishing Line

The Type of Fishing Line 

The type of fishing line you are using will give you a good idea regarding the durability of the fishing line. There are different types of fishing lines out there. These include braid, monofilament, and fluorocarbon.

Braid

Among all types of fishing lines out there, braid fishing lines come with the highest durability. If something did not happen unexpectedly, a braid fishing line could last up to a decade.  Happening something unexpectedly means since fishing itself is quite unpredictable, so is happening of incidents like tangling of fishing line with a submerged object that may require you severing the line. So no matter whether you are using a tough fishing line like a braid, a sudden incident can drastically reduce the lifespan of a fishing line.

One common mistake of many people regarding braid is when they see their braid is losing color, they think that the line is worn out and needs to be replaced. But, it’s a wrong idea because a particular color does not stick well to a braid that quickens the fading of it. So discoloring the braid does not tell anything about the endurance of the line.

Braid receives harsh treatment from rods guides if they are sharp and chipped. They eat away your braid unnoticed. The bale of your reel may also limit the lifespan of your braid. If the bale has sharp chipped edges, your braid may be snapped anytime. One effective technique you can apply to increase the lifespan of your braid is flipping the line on the fishing reel. If a flipping task is difficult for you, go to a tackle shop. It will do the task for you. Or you can do it yourself. Transfer the line to a spare reel or object. Then transfer the line to another spare reel or object. When you spool the line back to the reel again, the line will be ready to use.

Monofilament

This is the most popular type of fishing line. Fishermen simply call this fishing line mono. The monofilament line is like a long continuous cord that is made of nylon or synthetic fiber. Since monofilament is one single strand. The line comes with a nice stretchable property when subject to pull. How much stretch the monofilament can withstand is indicated by a parameter which is called test. The text refers to the amount of poundage that the line can sustain before the breakage.

Though monofilament is the most popular type of fishing line among other types of lines, it takes the least amount of time to turn into a bad line. It does not resist the wear and tear resulting from exposure to elements and UV rays for a long time. One important tip for fishermen who use monofilament is to change the line once in a year to ensure getting trouble-free fishing experience. The durability of a monofilament line also depends on the proper use of the line and the extent of abuse you exert on it.

Fluorocarbon

This line is 3 to 4 times stronger than monofilament. In other words, it’s strength is similar to monofilament. So, you can apply the similar care and maintenance procedure as you do for monofilament. The longevity of a fluorocarbon line is not a big issue since the line is mostly used as a leader which often undergoes frequent changes. Fluorocarbon has a structural similarity with monofilament. Like monofilament, it’s one continuous strand of the line but since the line is made of polyvinylidene fluoride, it is much stronger than monofilament.

Though fluorocarbon is much stiffer than that of monofilament, one limitation of this line is it does not wrap well around a reel. But this is a minor limitation of this fishing line while fluorocarbon is a number one choice of many fishermen due to the fact that the line supports all fishing conditions-whether it is saltwater fishing or freshwater. Its Near invisibility coupled with the rigid stiffness of the line makes it a highly efficient line to catch different types of fish species like walleye and bass. If you want to use a fluorocarbon line, choose your fluorocarbon line after reading reviews of products of several brands.

Another plus point of Fluorocarbon is that UV rays can’t damage the line. So this line does not lose its shape over time allowing anglers to catch fish for a long time. Unlike monofilament, fluorocarbon lines are a bit heavier but they are easy to spool, and using them is hassle-free.

When to Replace Fishing Lines

It depends on your fishing habits. Based on the type of fishing line you are using, follow below replacement recommendations

Braid
  • Don’t use braid if it has been sitting idle for 10 years
  • If you only enjoy weekend fishing, replacing it 3 to 4 years is fine
  • For moderate fishing- replace the line twice a year
  • If you involve in heavy fishing, the line needs to replace every year
Monofilament
  • Don’t spool monofilament if it is not in use for 2 to 3 years
  • For weekend fishing, replace it once a year
  • For moderate fishing, replace it 2 or 3 times each year
  • For a heavy fishing change, it more frequently likes 3 or 4 times in every year
Fluorocarbon
  • Discard the line if it has not been used for the last 7 years
  • For weekend fishing, it is fine to replace in 2 or 3 years
  • For moderate fishing, the frequency of replacement need to exceed a couple of times in each year
  • For a heavy fishing change, it quite often likes 2 or 3 times each year.
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