Survival of the Ready – Preparation is Paramount

Millions of people around the world have to face the trauma and consequences of an unforeseen disaster every year, and tens of thousands lose their lives.

You can rarely predict or avoid a disaster happening but you can often improve your odds of survival.

Ammo.com have put together a comprehensive guide for emergency preparation and looks at key reasons why you need to prepare for an emergency and what steps you can take to prepare.

The guide can show ready you are if disaster strikes.

 

Add Some Paracord to Water Bottles or Make a Paracord Can Koozie

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Here are a couple of examples of adding paracord to water bottles.

A 25 foot length was used for the one in a ‘whipping’ pattern on the aluminum water bottle. And a 40 foot length was used in a woven pattern on the white stainless steel water bottle. Both started off with coiling the cord around the bottles, with the starting end just held in place with a rubber band and later tucked to finish.The ‘whipping'(snaking) version, an example is seen in Geoffrey Budworth’s The Complete Book of Knots, is easily zigzagged and looped around a couple of coils on each end of the paracord coiled wraps, and tucked to finish.
The woven version resembles ‘grafting’ type knot work, as seen in Stuart Grainger’s ‘Creative Ropecraft’, but is instead a single length of cord. After coiling the cord around the bottle, one end is then worked in an over/under pattern, back up then down, all the way around the bottle. For this pattern, I went under three coils, over three coils, but like ‘grafting’, you can vary the pattern to your own tastes
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I used a Perma-Lok Jumbo Lacing Needle to feed the paracord over/under as I worked, as well as a pair of hemostats/forceps.Here’s a woven paracord can koozie, done with a 25 foot length of cord. The weaving is just like that done on the water bottle, but with the vertical over/under part done closer together for a tighter weave before changing to half hitching on the bottom.
I didn’t have much paracord on hand to work with, so I reused some from the previous project. I would have made the can koozie a little bit taller and fully closed up the bottom, if I’d started with a 30 foot length, and a couple more feet for a cinch cord/drawstring with a cord lock for alternate use as a pouch. It still works alright as it is for holding a soda/beer can…

Top Tip:

For cleaning paracord on a water bottle, hat, or paracord bracelet, I use a little anti-bacterial liquid soap and an old soft bristle toothbrush to get the cord clean, then let air dry or I’ll sometimes take ’em in the shower with me to get everything done in one trip, lol… 🙂

Or,  I just throw my wrapped thermos/cup into the dishwasher. I’ve had it for about 5 months now and it hasn’t been a problem.

Not Quite The Perfect 72 Hour Bug-Out Pack, But Close

72_hour_bugout_bag_pack-YZS

Although this may not quite be your perfect 72 Hour Bug-Out Pack, it’s close. We would add 2 additional items, a hand gun and ammunition. (but can’t offer those)

Key Items:

1. Delta Shock and Storm Proof Lighter

2. 1 Person Stainless Steel Mess Kit

3. Bear Grylls Ultimate Fixed Blade Knife

4. Carabineer LED Flashlight

5. SOL Origin Survival Tool

6. Survival Water Bottle and Kit Combo

7. Ranger CLQ Compass

8. Warm Polar Fleece Blanket

9. Hooligan 3 Tent

10. Infrared LED Flasher

11. 2400 Calorie Food Bar

12. Cook in the Pouch – Emergency 72 Hour Meal Kit

13. Les Stroud – Survivorman – Jungle Machete

14. Escape Backpack

One additional item not shown:

15. Deluxe Hygiene Kit

 

This is one illustration of the items you could consider for your own Bug-Out bag. We also carry pre-made Bug-Out bags ready when you are. Depending on your location and situation, you may want to add or delete items suggested here.

Bear in mind, this pack has all the elements to last you longer than 72 hours, with the exception of the food items, and your ability to find a source of water.

What would you add or remove from yours?

 

 

Protein Poisoning or Rabbit Starvation

by Guest Blogger OmegaMan

Many survival books discuss the topic of “Rabbit Starvation”.  The purpose of these articles is to remind the survivalist to keep a mixture of fats and proteins in their survival diet….that is to not just rely on the lean meats and proteins of such lean animals rabbit as a sole food source.

In essence, the stress put on a person during a survival situation, along with a lack of diversified nutrients can cause acute malnutrition if one relies on lean proteins as a food source.  Common symptoms which take about a week to appear are fatigue, headache and most concerning…diarrhea, low blood pressure and heart rate. This is caused by a build-up of urea and ammonia in the body as the kidneys struggle to digest large amounts of lean proteins.

There are stories of people gorging themselves on large quantities of lean meats alone that their stomachs will become distended.

Vilhjalmur Stefansson the Canadian arctic explorer wrote that the people eat till their stomachs are distended; but no matter how much they eat they feel unsatisfied. Some think a man will die sooner if he eats continually of fat-free meat than if he eats nothing, but this is a belief on which sufficient evidence for a decision has not been gathered in the North. Deaths from rabbit-starvation, or from the eating of other skinny meat, are rare; for everyone understands the principle, and any possible preventive steps are naturally taken.

Remember to eat the rabbits liver and brains to get some needed fat. The diarrhea may not go away until fats are added to the diet.

Remember, the real point is to get an intake of various essential nutrients and not just rely on pure protein from rabbits or any other lean meats. When possible, vary your diet with carbs, grains, proteins and important survival fats.

A little unknown fact is that in Air Force Survival  recruits are taught to eat the undigested leaves from the rabbits stomach to also add to their dietary intakes. I am told it tastes like a bitter pesto.

What Do Rat Whiskers And Surviving Have in Common?

by Guest Blogger OmegaMan

Psychiatrist Curt RichterEver heard of Psychiatrist Curt Richter? He studied the consequences of emotional stress when trying to survive. He noticed that when living things are subjected to great pressure, many will just give up and die. If the stress was psychological, then why did the subjects mind and body appear to collapse?

In short, Richter was experimenting putting rats in a tub of water. At room temperature the rat could swim about 80 hrs non-stop before giving up. If he stressed the rat by lowering or raising the water temperature or even blowing air into its face, a rat could still swim between 20 and 40 hrs. He also found that once a rat picked its direction, it would generally stick with either a clockwise or counter clockwise direction without changing. Many things from ants to lobsters will do this if one or their antennae or whiskers are cut also.

Richter decided to study the effects on direction by cutting the whiskers on just one side of a rats face. By accident…guess what they discovered? The rat swam for only a few minutes, gave up and sank to the bottom! Just for the record, they actually rescued it.

How could this happen? What effect could cutting whiskers have on survival longevity? Well, upon investigation, it wasn’t so much in the cutting of the whiskers as it was in the procedure. He found that his assistants had un-intentionally frightened and stressed the rat by first capturing it in a firmly held black bag and then dropping it into water. It was the “trauma” induced fear response that had sent the rat into over stimulated exhaustion.

Curt Richter also found if he removed the rat just before sinking, let it rest for a few minutes, the rat would relax and seem to realize it in fact that it could survive. If thrown back into the water, it could swim for hours. If it was allowed to play with the stressful black bag first and then thrown back into the water and rescued several times…its survival training would cause it to perform better than those rats without training. Interesting how this relates to the survivability of humans thrown into their own survival situation.

In summary, it was concluded that momentary “HOPE” had an extreme influence on helping the body & mind, cope with an adverse survival situation.

Remember…Never panic! Never give up…!

 

Quick Tip | Add These To Your Bugout Bag

Travel much?

If you do, then why not take advantage of the additional shampoo, soap, lotion, mouthwash, shower cap, sewing kit, etc… and save them. They make excellent short term cleaning solutions to add to your bugout bag.

They are light-weight, small and easy to carry. Plus, they don’t take up much room and best of all they are FREE! (or, if you don’t travel, you can just buy trial size products at your local drug store)

I like to put them into small sandwich size ziplock bags and keep them in my various bugout bags and car kits.

Potassium Iodide: What does it do?

In the aftermath of a nuclear emergency, radioactive Iodine can get into your body through eating, drinking or breathing.

Your thyroid gland may be seriously damaged as it absorbs this radioactive chemical. One way to protect this gland and prevent absorption is to make your thyroid “full” by taking non radioactive (KI)Potassium Iodide tablets.

The CDC recommends the following dosages upon advisories emergency officials. They may recommend taking one dose every 24 hours up to a few days.

This is especially important for pregnant woman, young adults and children.

Adults older than 40 should not take KI unless advised.

  • Adults should take 130 mg (one 130 mg tablet OR two 65 mg tablets OR two mL of solution).
  • Women who are breastfeeding should take the adult dose of 130 mg.
  • Children between 3 and 18 years of age should take 65 mg (one 65 mg tablet OR 1 mL of solution). Children who are adult size (greater than or equal to 150 pounds) should take the full adult dose, regardless of their age.
  • Infants and children between 1 month and 3 years of age should take 32 mg (½ of a 65 mg tablet OR ½ mL of solution). This dose is for both nursing and non-nursing infants and children.
  • Newborns from birth to 1 month of age should be given 16 mg (¼ of a 65 mg tablet or ¼ mL of solution). This dose is for both nursing and non-nursing newborn infants.

The CDC advises that KI “can protect only the thyroid from radioactive iodine, not other parts of the body”…and will not reverse damage that has already occurred.

We recommend the following educational site for more information: http://emergency.cdc.gov/radiation/ki.asp

Essentials: Modern Survival Kit

Essentials Of The Modern Survival Kit

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Doomsday preppers, Prepper Nation, Prepping to survive, Bugout bags, Blackout kits, EMP

 

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