How to Survive in Space After the Ultimate Disaster

How to Survive in Space
Source: Emergency-Management-Degree.org

How to Survive in Space After the Ultimate Disaster

Prepper’s guide to surviving in space

Could humanity actually survive the ultimate emergency: the end of the world? From black holes to starvation, these are the essentials when it comes to surviving in space after a disaster destroys our Mother Earth.

Radiation

Simply leaving Earth’s atmosphere exposes you to more radiation than is healthy.

Earth’s atmosphere protects from radiation the way a 1 meter thick slab of metal would.

Problem:
1 Sievert = +5.5% rise in risk of fatal cancers
One round trip to Mars = .66 Sieverts
The equivalent of a full body CT scan every 5-6 days.

Solution:
Prolonged habitation on planets with weak atmospheres would require living underground.
Or,
A magnetosphere (for spaceships):
Magnetic fields like what earth is encased in can deflect radiation.
Shields need to be made of fibers.
Bulky materials are weak with spaces and imperfections.
A spider’s web is strong because it is made of individual unbroken threads.
Radiation sensors can alert space travelers when they need to be behind shields.

Starvation

It costs $10,000 per lb of food sent to the International Space Station–we’re going to need to grow food as we fly.
Astronauts currently get 3.8 pounds of food per day.
This is 7,000 lbs of food per person to get to mars and back.

Introducing Space Farming!
FOR SPACECRAFT GROWTH, consider:
Plant size
Antioxidants (fights radiation)
Quick growth time
No processing equipment required

Good candidates:
Lettuce
Spinach
Carrots
Tomatoes
Spring onions
Cabbage
Radishes

This keeps you fed, but growing food also:
Reduces stress
Improves mood
Alleviates depression
Promotes social growth
Pushes mental and physical rehabilitation
And increases resistance to general illness.

FOR GROWTH ON FOREIGN PLANETS, consider terraforming:
Ideally leading to an ecosystem, with oxygen produced
Carbon dioxide reduced,
And water recycled.

Space Dust

Wait…Moondust can be deadly?
It is the consistency of flour… so it:
Slips through gaps in equipment,
Is easily kicked up,
Sticks to people

Causing:
Radioactive exposure,
Allergic reactions,
Lung cancer from inhalation.

And Mars dust might be worse.

Space Junk

Debris that orbits the earth travels at 17,500 mph.
Orbiting for millions of years.

Even a small fleck of paint
Can disable a middle-sized spacecraft.
–> Any collision then makes more spaces of space junk.

Static Electricity

Yes…static electricity can disable equipment in space.

In humid conditions, water conducts electrons off of our body.
Space is incredibly dry.

Every time equipment touches other objects in space
chance for equipment crippling static electricity occurs.

NASA has a reverse lightning rod.

Black Holes

Once you’re past the event horizon, that black hole isn’t letting you go.
Event horizon: the point around a black hole where gravity is so strong that light and radiation can’t escape.
–Meaning– We can’t see past the event horizon.

Small black holes(the size of earth) are extreme.
To get pulled past the event horizon
Would instantly turn you into a stream of subatomic particles.

Larger black holes give you more time (literally)

As you accelerate faster and faster you move through time more slowly.
Things falling into the hole in front of you slow in time more.
So in front of you, you can see things previously fallen into the hole
And behind you, you can see things from the future, rapidly approaching you.

Meanwhile you’ll “spaghetifi” because the gravity on your head (or whichever end is falling into the hole first)
will be so much more than that on your feet.

Water

Turns out there is water in space. [11]

Interplanetary dust contains both hydrogen and oxygen, at times mixing to rain down on surfaces.

Interplanetary dust is also the most carbon-rich meteoric substance.
With 30,000 – 40,000 tons of interplanetary dust raining onto Earth yearly
It could have been the origin of life on Earth.
–> And it could sustain us in space in the future.

So surviving in space isn’t a cinch. There’s a reason it’s called the final frontier.

 

Citations:

  1. http://www.space.com/21353-space-radiation-mars-mission-threat.html
  2. http://www.nasa.gov/vision/space/travelinginspace/radiation_shielding.html
  3. http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/27/world/europe/star-trek-shield/
  4. http://modernfarmer.com/2013/09/starship-salad-bar/
  5. http://news.discovery.com/space/history-of-space/kitchen-mars-astronauts-110829.htm
  6. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130328075708.htm
  7. http://www.cracked.com/article_19158_the-6-weirdest-dangers-space-travel.html
  8. http://www.wired.com/science/space/news/2005/04/67110
  9. http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/01581/SpaceTravelEnglish/dangers/spacedebris.html
  10. http://www.livescience.com/19683-happen-fall-black-hole.html
  11. http://www.space.com/24422-solar-wind-makes-water-star-dust.html

Garlic – The Ultimate Survival Tool

Garlic may be the perfect survival tool.

Mother Earth provides survival foods.

Garlic has been used by mankind for over 7,000 years! Garlic tastes amazing, at least to us, but did you know just how powerful this herb is. It does more than just keep Vampires at bay.

Survival benefits of garlic

Just some of the Uses of Garlic that have been claimed

  • Acne
  • Athlete’s foot
  • Blood thinning
  • Cold sore treatment
  • Cold prevention
  • Cough syrup
  • Diabetes
  • Weight Loss Aid
  • Mosquito repellent
  • Pesticide
  • Psoriasis relief
  • Gas prevention
  • Ear infections
  • Splinter removal
  • Facial Skin cleanser
  • Yeast infections
  • Parasite killer
  • Fish bait
  • Mole removal
  • Hair loss help
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Reduces blood pressure
  • Toothaches

 

[source]

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By Land or By Water, To Survive You Must Have Alternatives

To survive, you need to have alternative options. Don’t forget about using your local water-ways as a route to take in the event of an emergency. Many times the roads might be blocked. You can travel for miles on creeks and rivers using nothing more than a canoe, kayak, or inflatable raft. They can be very valuable in getting from one place to another when the SHTF.

Here are a few top picks from our Year Zero Survival staff:

Travel Kayak Deluxe 12′ 2 Person Inflatable Kayak

Travel Kayak Deluxe 12′ 2 Person Inflatable Kayak

Inflatable kayaks are perfect for bugging out, camping, vacationing, exploring remote areas, and cruising yachts. They’re also great for paddling enthusiasts that don’t want to drive around with a kayak on their rooftop! AIRHEAD Travel Kayaks fit easily into the trunk of your car, duffel bag or suitcase. When you feel the itch to paddle, your boat is with you!

 

Rave Sea Rebel™ Inflatable Kayak

Rave Sea Rebel™ Inflatable Kayak

This one-person kayak inflates in minutes and features a water resistant dry bag and water bottle holder, with adjustable backrest. Includes a paddle, hand pump, carrying bag.

 

QuikPak K3 Covered Sit-On-Top Inflatable Kayak

QuikPak K3 Covered Sit-On-Top Inflatable Kayak

One person inflatable sit-on-top kayak. The grab and go kayak! Five minute setup, from backpack to kayak. Perfect for an emergency set up.

 

4 Person Inflatable Boat

4 Person Inflatable Boat

Gear bag, grab line, Four person inflatable boat.

 

Zodiac Zoom 230 Roll Up

Zodiac Zoom 230 Roll Up

It has an impressive load capacity so you can carry more supplies. The truncated cone tube ends provide great buoyancy.

 

Zodiac Wave 11′ Boat w/Marine Plywood Floor & Inflatable Keel – 5 Passenger

Zodiac Wave 11′ Boat w/Marine Plywood Floor & Inflatable Keel – 5 Passenger

 

The big daddy of them all, The `Wave by Zodiac’ is an easy-to-use inflatable designed for a quick set-up and easy storage. The lightweight, durable design allows for rugged use in extreme conditions. Key benefits that set these boats apart from conventional boats include:

Exceptional Load
There is enough room in the boat to comfortably fit the whole family, and remarkable buoyancy that conventional boats just can’t match.

Reassuring Stability
Provides safe loading and unloading as well as a safe and reassuring platform for fishing, daily cruising and ship to shore tendering.

Portability
‘Wave by Zodiac’ packs up to fit into your trunk, ensuring your ability to get to all those secret fishing and great boating spots.

Lightweight
At just 98 lbs. this lightweight boat can be launched from any type of waterfront with ease – much less work than launching an aluminum or fiberglass boat.

Economical Operation
The `Wave by Zodiac’ requires only a small outboard engine (maximum 15hp) for excellent boating performance, which saves on fuel and reduces weight adding to these boats excellent portability characteristics.

Unique Floor Systems
The ‘Wave by Zodiac’ comes equipped with a 5-piece wooden floorboard system with aluminum stringers to keep the floor system locked flat and stable.

 

All of these are simple to inflate and deflate, without the storage and care concerns of other rigid boats or canoes. Something to consider as part of your survival and prepper planning.

See all of the Bugout Boats available HERE

100 Items That Will Disappear First In The U. S. When The SHTF

We saw it with Sandy, and now you are seeing it with the severe winter storms this year, the un-prepared hoards of people buying anything and everything off of the store shelves.

Natural disasters happen. It’s Mother Nature. Do you think you could last a few days, weeks, or even months without the basics of food, water, gas and electricity? What is your plan? Do you have food insurance built up? Water? Fuel? Etc…

100 Items That Will Disappear First In The US When Disaster Strikes.

You can start small and build up your supplies over time. You may even have many of theses items already.

Below is a list of the 100 items most likely to disappear in a disaster scenario:

1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy…target of thieves; maintenance etc.)
2. Water Filters/Purifiers
3. Portable Toilets
4. Seasoned Firewood. Wood takes about 6 – 12 months to become dried, for home uses.
5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps (First Choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile ANY!)
6. Coleman Fuel. Impossible to stockpile too much.
7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.
8. Hand-can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.
9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar
10. Rice – Beans – Wheat
11. Vegetable Oil (for cooking) Without it food burns/must be boiled etc.,)
12. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid (Will become scarce suddenly)
13. Water Containers (Urgent Item to obtain.) Any size. Small: HARD CLEAR PLASTIC ONLY – note – food grade if for drinking.
14. Mini Heater head (Propane) (Without this item, propane won’t heat a room.)
15. Grain Grinder (Non-electric)
16. Propane Cylinders (Urgent: Definite shortages will occur.
17. Survival Guide Book.
18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting is difficult.)
19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula. ointments/aspirin, etc.
20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)
21. Cookstoves (Propane, Coleman & Kerosene)
22. Vitamins
23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder (Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous without this item)
24. Feminine Hygiene/Hair-care/Skin products.
25. Thermal underwear (Tops & Bottoms)
26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, Wedges (also, honing oil)
27. Aluminum Foil Reg. & Heavy Duty (Great Cooking and Barter Item)
28. Gasoline Containers (Plastic & Metal)
29. Garbage Bags (Impossible To Have Too Many).
30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels
31. Milk – Powdered & Condensed (Shake Liquid every 3 to 4 months)
32. Garden Seeds (Non-Hybrid) (A MUST)
33. Clothes pins/line/hangers (A MUST)
34. Coleman’s Pump Repair Kit
35. Tuna Fish (in oil)
36. Fire Extinguishers (or..large box of Baking Soda in every room)
37. First aid kits
38. Batteries (all sizes…buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)
39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
40. Big Dogs (and plenty of dog food)
41. Flour, yeast & salt
42. Matches. {“Strike Anywhere” preferred.) Boxed, wooden matches will go first
43. Writing paper/pads/pencils, solar calculators
44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in Wintertime.)
45. Work-boots, belts, Levis & durable shirts
46. Flashlights/LIGHTSTICKS & torches, “No. 76 Dietz” Lanterns
47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks (jot down ideas, feelings, experience; Historic Times)
48. Garbage cans Plastic (great for storage, water, transporting – if with wheels)
49. Men’s Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail clippers, etc
50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)
51. Fishing supplies/tools
52. Mosquito coils/repellent, sprays/creams
53. Duct Tape
54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
55. Candles
56. Laundry Detergent (liquid)
57. Backpacks, Duffel Bags
58. Garden tools & supplies
59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.
61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)
62. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)
63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
64. Bicycles…Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc
65. Sleeping Bags & blankets/pillows/mats
66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
67. Board Games, Cards, Dice
68. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)
71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap (saves a lot of water)
72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
73. Shaving supplies (razors & creams, talc, after shave)
74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
75. Soy sauce, vinegar, bullions/gravy/soup-base
76. Reading glasses
77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
78. “Survival-in-a-Can
79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
80. Boy Scout Handbook, / also Leaders Catalog
81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)
82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)
85. Lumber (all types)
86. Wagons & carts (for transport to and from)
87. Cots & Inflatable mattress’s
88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.
89. Lantern Hangers
90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws,, nuts & bolts
91. Teas
92. Coffee
93. Cigarettes
94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc,)
95. Paraffin wax
96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.
97. Chewing gum/Candy/Chocolate
98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)
99. Hats & Bandanas, cotton neckerchiefs
100. Goats/Chickens/Rabbits

Some Thoughts From a Sarajevo War Survivor:

Experiencing horrible things that can happen in a war – death of parents and
friends, hunger and malnutrition, endless freezing cold, fear, sniper attacks.

1. Stockpiling helps. But you never no how long trouble will last, so locate
near renewable food sources.
2. Living near a water well with a manual pump is like being in Eden.
3. After awhile, even gold can lose its luster. But there is no luxury in war
quite like toilet paper. Its surplus value is greater than gold‘s.
4. If you had to go without one utility, lose electricity – it’s the easiest to
do without (unless you’re in a very nice climate with no need for heat.)
5. Canned foods are awesome, especially if their contents are tasty without
heating. One of the best things to stockpile is canned gravy – it makes a lot of
the dry unappetizing things you find to eat in war somewhat edible. Only needs
enough heat to “warm”, not to cook. It’s cheap too, especially if you buy it in
bulk.
6. Bring some books – escapist ones like romance or mysteries become more
valuable as the war continues. Sure, it’s great to have a lot of survival
guides, but you’ll figure most of that out on your own anyway – trust me, you’ll
have a lot of time on your hands.
7. The feeling that you’re human can fade pretty fast. I can’t tell you how many
people I knew who would have traded a much needed meal for just a little bit of
toothpaste, rouge, soap or cologne. Not much point in fighting if you have to
lose your humanity. These things are morale-builders like nothing else.
8. Slow burning candles and matches, matches, matches

10 Best Survival Foods To Get At Your Local Supermarket

Prepping for disasters can seem overwhelming with so many aspects to be considered. However, for those just beginning to recognize how perilous these times are and are new to prepping, you can find many great survival foods at your local grocery store.

What to buy at your grocery store to prep for when you need doomsday survival.

There are many freeze-dried food options offering light-weight ready to eat meals. These are cost effective and great for new preppers.  But if you don’t have a lot of $’s laying around to buy a large supply, it may be better to pick up a few buckets quarterly and some basic key items each week at the supermarket to build up your food bank gradually.

It’s best to keep your survival food list simple, and concentrate on storing foods with the highest amount of calories and the longest shelf life. This list is geared toward foods that will help you survive a crisis that lasts for extended periods of time.

Here are the ten best and cheapest survival rations available at any store:

Bowl of Rice

Rice

Rice: Every time you go to the store you should buy one 10-lb bag of rice. You can find them for around $5 at most supermarkets. Rice will stay in good condition for 10 years or more if stored properly. It offers high carbohydrates which is especially important if you are exerting a lot of physical energy during a crisis.

beans

Beans

Beans: Beans are known to be one of the best all-round survival foods. They’re high in protein, and if sealed in food-grade buckets with a small amount of dried ice, they’ll stay for up to ten years. Make sure to store them in a cool, dry, dark location. Buy a 4-5 lb bags of dried beans every time you go to the store. All dry beans are good to store; black beans, red beans, pinto beans, lentils, etc.

cornmeal

Cornmeal

Cornmeal:  All-purpose flours are good to store, but cornmeal may be the best overall. Cornmeal is packed with dense carbohydrates and contains oils that helps extend its shelf life. Additionally, if the power grid is down during a mega disaster, it is much easier to make good corn breads and tortillas with cornmeal in a simple skillet or solar oven, where refined flour will need yeast and oil to make decent bread or biscuits.  Get a 5-lb bag of cornmeal ($10-$15) at each grocery visit.  Seal and store the same way as beans (buckets, salt and dry ice), and it will safely keep 8 months to 2 years.

spoonful of lard

Lard

Lard: If you’re a health-conscious reader, hydrogenated lard does not sound very appetizing, but in a survival situation you can’t afford to be picky. Animal lard or vegetable shortening both offer much-needed calories during times of crisis, cooking oil for multiple uses, and it will keep longer than cooking oils because of the hydrogenation. Buy a 6-lb can ($12) and store in a cool, dry, and dark place and it will stay good for 2-3 years or longer.

salt

Salt

Salt: Salt is one of the most useful survival food items. It’s used for storing food, curing beef, and flavoring most meals. Salt will last forever, so always buy extra when you’re shopping.

Canned Fruit and Vegetables

Canned Fruit and Vegetables

Canned Fruit & Vegetables: These are another obvious survival food, but not as practical as many would think. They’re heavy and somewhat costly for the calories they deliver. Additionally, acidic fruits and any cans with tomatoes will not keep as long as most people think.  But most canned food is good for 5+ years.  Buy green vegetables and fruits like peaches and pears for long-term storage, but more importantly, buy what you already eat in case you need to rotate them into your diet before they go bad.

Canned Meats

Canned Meats

Canned Meat: Canned meats like ham, tuna, and chicken are excellent to store.  They typically will keep for 6-10 years and they’re an excellent source of protein. However, if the grid is down for a long time (apocalyptic), hunting and fishing will likely provide most meats.  Therefore, it may be sufficient to buy extra canned meats every other time you go shopping.

Brown and white sugar

Sugar

Sugar: Brown and white sugar will add much-needed flavor and calories to a survival diet and they’ll keep for ten years or more if stored properly.  Honey is also excellent as it will store forever. Make sure to buy extra every other time you go grocery shopping. You won’t need too much, but they’ll be well worth having if a crisis strikes.

pasta

Pasta

Pasta: Pasta is a good light-weight storable food that is also a great source of carbohydrates. Pasta will not keep as long as rice, but it can stay for around 5 years in good conditions. Pasta is also very inexpensive and extra should be bought at each trip to the store.  It will take up more space in your food bank than rice, beans and cornmeal, so plan your space the best you can.

Peanut Butter

Peanut Butter

Peanut Butter: Peanut butter is a terrific source of protein, fat, and calories.  Plus, it’s just a great treat to have on hand. Peanut butter can last up to five years in root cellar conditions.  Stock up whenever there are good deals at your grocery store. You’ll be happy you did if the SHTF.

If you consistently buy these items 3-4 times per month, you’ll quickly acquire a year’s supply of survival rations for your whole family.

Buying at a bulk grocery store may help you either save money, or get more supplies. There are Costco discount codes to help you get these items at a better price.

How to store it?

A really basic way to store the rice, beans, cornmeal, sugar and pastas is to buy several 5-gallon seal-able paint buckets or food-grade buckets from your local hardware store. Put a cup or so of salt into a sandwich baggie (opened) at the bottom of the buckets. Then fill it with food stuffs and add a couple of ounces of dried ice (found at large grocery stores) which will remove the oxygen from the bucket after it’s sealed. Finally, label each bucket with its contents and the date, and place it in your cellar.

Please let us know what other food items you think will be useful for new preppers….

via Activist Post: 10 Best Survival Foods At Your Local Supermarket.

Homemade Emergency Canned Heat

can_wlid

We lost power at 4:23 am on Saturday morning. We had power restored at 11 am on Monday. It was a long few days. We were able to stay in our house. Thankfully no pipes broke and there were no major events other than the power outage.

I want to really encourage you all to be prepared for such emergencies. We have moved twice in the last year and had let our supplies dwindle. We had no propane for the camp stove. We had no firewood. Not a good situation to be in. We did have some knowledge though and that helped us to get through until we were able to get wood and propane.

You can make your own “Sterno” at home for heating water. It is an open flame. By that I mean OPEN FLAME! Especially when initially lit. The flame starts out tall and then gets shorter. I found this to be true each time it was lit (not just the very first time). tall_flame

Never to be put where it can tip over, get knocked over, be around children (we have 5 of those), etc. I decided to clear one side of my sink and put the can in the sink to hopefully minimize any accidents.The flame is burning off alcohol so it can not be put out with water. I wanted to be clear that I put it in the sink not so I could douse it with water, but in case it tipped over I would at least not have flame rolling across my floor.  I was also careful to clear the area around the sink of anything flammable.  This homemade cooking/heating gave us some hot water and our first hot meal (Spaghetti-o’s) in 24 hours.  Having a way to heat food & drinks really boosted our moral.

Supplies:

  • Large metal can & its lid
  • Roll of toilet paper
  • Isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol)

How To Make:

Clean The Can: You need a large clean metal can and it’s lid. In our case, I emptied a can of crushed tomatoes into a bowl, cleaned the can and lid (be careful of sharp edges) and dried them. Do NOT throw away the lid!

The Toilet Paper: Remove the cardboard tube from the toilet paper roll. Fold the TP roll in half length wise and then in half again (you’re crushing the roll and making it as compact as possible). Insert the roll of toilet paper into the can. Wrap additional toilet paper around your hand (making a mini-roll of TP) and compact in the same way you did the large roll – use this to fill in any spaces. Repeat until you have the can tightly packed with toilet paper.

flat_roll

folded_roll

Adding Alcohol: Slowly pour the isopropyl alcohol over over the TP in the can until the TP is saturated. This took nearly 2 bottles in my case.

Use:

Hold a match to the alcohol. It should light right up. This will burn nicely for quite some time. To put the flame out simply lay the lid on top of the flame. I am told that snuffing (eliminating any source of oxygen) is the only way to put this flame out. That is why you need the lid. I used tongs to put the lid on because I had them available. Make sure the flame is out and keep it out of the reach of children.

After several uses you see a bit of charring on the TP & some blue candle wax from lighting it (we were conserving matches).

After several uses you see a bit of charring on the TP & some blue candle wax from lighting it (we were conserving matches).

cooking

You will need to hold the pot above the flame (resting the pot on the flame will put it out). I used an oven rack across my sink.

 

**Please know that I am sharing this in the hope that it may come in handy one day to you or your family. YOU are 100% responsible for your safety should you choose to try this. I can make no guarantees on how well or how safe it is. As with any open flame; you must make sure there is proper ventilation. Keep yourselves safe! I used the canned heat several times before we were able to obtain propane for our camp stove and I had no problems using it. I made sure my children were no where near me when dealing with the can in any way.