10 Tips On How To Survive In The Woods

10 Tips to survive in the woods. - YearZeroSurvival.com

Camping and outdoor adventures are a treasured pastime of this great nation. Unfortunately, you cannot always account for something going wrong when you are out alone in the woods. Survival can be very difficult in more unforgiving circumstances that can be found in the wild, and you should get yourself prepared for this possibility with these survival wilderness tips:

  1. Remain Calm

The absolute worst thing that you can do when things go sideways on a hike or camping trip is to panic. With a clear head, you can make rational decisions and better plan your next thing that has to be done in order to stay alive and stay alert for potential rescue.

  1. Get A Fire Going

Another critical aspect of your survival is going to be warmth and food preparation. This is done through building a fire. While you don’t need a substantial burning inferno, you should have a decent flame going so that you don’t have to constantly be babysitting it to prevent it from going out. An ideal fire can last for a couple of hours without you having to adjust it or add on to it.

  1. Find A Source of Drinkable Water

Likely you have brought along enough water for the time that you intended to be out in the wilderness, but that is about it. When you become stranded or lost, you have to be thinking about water sources to keep yourself hydrated. Streams and creeks can be a good source of water in a pinch, so scope out your surroundings and find a spot to get a steady drinking source.

  1. Start Thinking Shelter

If you were just out in the woods for a hike or a day-long excursion, you are not likely toting around a tent with you. Creating a shelter might seem like a tall order, but sites like https://www.survivalenvy.com can help you get some lightweight portable gear that can make a quality short-term shelter until help arrives.

  1. Take Note of Your Supplies

Understanding what you have and how much of it you have can be the difference in your survival. Rationing out the food, for instance, ensures that you are able to stay nourished over longer periods of time rather than eating all of your available food well before being rescued or making it back to civilization.

  1. Know Ahead of Time What Plants Are Edible

It is always sound advice to understand the vegetation in the area well ahead of your trip. Know what kinds of plants that you can eat, and which ones will cause you harm or make you sick. If you find yourself without food to eat, this knowledge can keep you alive.

  1. Put Your Multi-Tool To Work

Your multi-tool can have a number of great purposes when you find yourself stranded. Pliers can prove a helpful implement for creating a shelter and a knife can help create a spear to skewer fish from brooks and creeks.

  1. Get Your Bearings

Whether you have a compass or not, you should be able to find north at any time of the day by the position of the sun or certain stars in the sky. This can help you determine a definitive direction to travel to end up back where you came from.

  1. Prepare A Distress Signal

If the direction cannot help you find your way back home, you have to think of a way to signal from great distances where you are when help arrives. This can be another important reason for keeping your fire going all hours of the day and night.

  1. Talk To Your Friends and Family Ahead of Time

You can avoid the panic of not being found by talking out your planned excursion with friends and family. If they know where you are, and where you planned to go, finding you should go a lot more quickly.

These are some quality tips to help you survive out in the woods. While no one can anticipate this kind of emergency situation happening, mentally preparing for the possibility and keeping your cool through this trying time can help you to stay alive.

5 Alloy Steels And Different Properties Of Blade Knife Materials

Are you planning to customize a knife for yourself?

Are you an enthusiastic knives collector?

Knives are small, sharp weapons which are used for multiple purposes, depending on the need. They are extremely dangerous steel products; some look dangerously luxurious (specially made for collectors), while some are simply designed to get the most use out of it.

Uses

The various uses of knives:

  1. In the kitchen
  2. Collectable item
  3. To hunt animals
  4. For self defence
  5. For safety purposes

Different Alloy Steels

If you desire to change the properties of steel, you can mix certain elements to it and modify its properties, during the melting process. The following are some of the additions for modifying knife properties:

  • Carbon

Even though, it is not an alloying element, adding carbon increases the hardness of the blade. Carbon is an easily found element in nature and it is a common practice to add it to steel to increase its durability and hardness.

 

  • Molybdenum

It is not found in free state on Earth, rather in various oxidation states in minerals. It is added to the blade steel to increase its tensile strength, hardenability and corrosion resistance. It basically modifies the steel and upgrades it, as it is used in the steel industry to make superalloys and high-strength alloys.

 

  • Vanadium

It is found in nature in various minerals and fossil fuel deposits. It improves the hardenability of the steel; promoting fine grains. The grain structure in steel is important because it directly affects the wear resistance and strength of the blade. Swordsmiths try to make a blade with fine grain structure because it makes the best blades; a desirable structure for all.

 

  • Chromium

It is easily found in the environment from the erosion of chromium-containing rocks. It improves wear resistance, corrosion resistance and hardenability. It is one of the major martensitic stainless steels; commonly used for sports cutlery applications.

 

  • Nickel

Pure native nickel is found in Earth’s crust in tiny amounts. It is added to the blade steel to improve its toughness, corrosion resistance and hardenability. It is one of the major elements in Austenitic stainless steel, also used for dive knives. Millions of tons are used annually around the world.

As you have already seen above, adding alloys make the blade steel better in every aspect, depending on the alloy element. It is widely practiced around the world by swordsmiths because it not just increases its durability, but also its attraction to the buyer.

Different Properties of Steel

The selection of steel solely depends on the properties of the steel and its manufacturability. Different properties are established by adding alloys, as already mentioned above. The following are some of the common properties of blade steel:

  • Toughness

It refers to the ability of the blade steel to absorb energy prior to its fracturing.

 

  • Hardness

It refers to the ability of the blade steel to resist permanent deformation. It is measure on a Rockwell scale.

 

  • Strength

It refers to the ability of the blade steel to resist to applied forces.

 

  • Hardenability

It refers to the ability of the blade steel to harden through the heat-treating process.

 

  • Ductility

It refers to the ability of the blade steel to bend or flex without fracturing.

 

  • Corrosion resistance

It refers to the ability of the blade steel to resist deterioration due to reactions with the environmental elements like water or air etcetera.

 

  • Wear resistance

It refers to the ability of the blade steel to resist abrasion and wear during use. It totally depends on the use by the owner because it is variable for different blades and their owners.

 

  • Initial sharpness

It simply means the sharpness of the ‘out of the box’ blade.

 

  • Edge retention

It refers to the ability of the blade steel to hold an edge without frequent resharpening. It simply means till what time the blade can remain sharp before the edge wears out or become useless.

 

  • Manufacturability

It refers to the ease with which the blade steel can be blanked, machined, ground or heat-treated.

Own a Knife Now

Do you think you know enough among blades now?

Own one yourself and experience the thrill that it gives you to have a sharp collector knife in your hand or use it at something to see how dangerous it could be. There are various places where you can find knives for sale in UK, USA or Australia and order them now!

10 Tips to Creating a Comfortable Mattress Outdoors

Long before orthopedic beds and latex mattresses were invented, people slept on the ground, on animal fur, on leaves or straws. History teaches us that the ancient Romans used straw for their mattresses, and in Asia, inhabitants opted for rice chaff (the non-edible husks). Oat chaff was the primary material for beds in Scotland. Leaves, reeds or seaweed were also considered good mattress-fillers in other parts of the world.

Nowadays, people who live off-grid often choose to handmade their beds and mattresses, using whatever they have at their disposal: straw, feathers, wool. Creating a bedstead with natural elements may seem challenging, but it only takes creativity, some manual labor, basic tools and a few tips, which I have already prepared for you.

 

Straw is better than hay

It may be easier to find hay when being outdoors, but straws are better suited for a mattress. Many people are allergic to hay, and sometimes they don’t even know it. Therefore straw is the safer choice. Besides, there’s often plenty of it available after cereal crops have been harvested.

Straw Bed

Carry a tick

Whether you’re just going camping or you’re in a critical situation, make sure you have a tick in your backpack or survival kit. It is a mattress cover, and you can make it from any material you like – usually, they were made from canvas woven from hemp, but presently any resistant material can be an option. When you’re out there, you’ll just unpack the tick and fill it with local stuffing – straw, fallen leaves, even grass.

 

Stuff tightly

The secret is to stuff evenly and tightly, so you won’t have lumps in your mattress. You can use a stick to push the straws into corners or even get inside the tick and arrange them properly, as trymattres.com suggests.

 

Get dry ingredients

Whether you’re using straw, leaves, grass or even hay, make sure they are dry. If it’s raining and everything is wet, try finding dry moss (on trees or rocks) and fill the tick with it.

 

Go freestyle

What if you don’t have a tick? You’ll be just fine sleeping on the ground! Get together as many leaves as you can, moss, hay, straws, anything you can find. Make a pile and give it the shape of a mattress, to fit your whole body. Your bed is made.

Laef Bed

Check for bugs

Even if you are extremely brave, you don’t want to wake up because something is moving through your handmade mattress! So before stuffing the natural elements into the tick (if this is how you’ll create your bed), I advise you to check for crawling beings.

 

Be a caveman

If you’re a hunter and your prey is a big animal, remember that its skin or fur can be a warm and comfortable bed for you. But this is something that requires a particular set of skills. Skinning an animal is not an easy job, and not anyone can do it.

 

Make a water mattress

If you’re near a water source, take advantage of it. You’ll need a few essential items for this: thick plastic foil, transfer or baking paper, a flat iron, adhesive tape and a hose. That’s why this distinct type of mattress is not something you could make in the wild, but it’s an excellent choice for outdoor camping. Tutorials can be found on the web, and the outcome will be a hit.

water bed

Braided twigs

Get all the twigs you can find and braid a mat. It may take a while, but you don’t need other tools than your hands. You can sleep directly on the mesh, or you can put leaves, straw or hay on it.

 

Do some digging

Dig a four-square or round hole in the ground, big enough to fit you and several inches deep. Put the leaves, grass, straw or hay in it and prepare for a warm sleep. Mother Earth is there to provide for you.

 

How to Make a Good Emergency Plan for Your Family

Maybe you receive a fair bit of warning, like a weather report predicting a hurricane, or maybe a sudden tectonic shift creates an earthquake with both immediate and cascading, destructive effects. Either way, there is no reason to be caught off guard and without an emergency plan.

Given that even fairly basic emergency plans can be prepared relatively easily and cheaply, finding yourself surprised by a sudden catastrophe places yourself and loved ones at risk without a good justification. If you are still sitting on the fence, or more likely the couch, here are five reasons why you should have an emergency plan ready and waiting for the unforeseen.

How to Build a Disaster Kit Infographic

 

5 Reasons Why is Important to Have a Family Emergency Plan

Speed – When a disaster strikes, time is the most valuable resource and one that you simply cannot get more of. That is why a proper emergency plan includes more than just the supplies you have collected. It includes a comprehensive approach that accounts for all stages of response. One of the most important is the very first stage.

Regardless the disaster, the first stage will involve organizing the party in a single location if possible. If the party members are separated, plans for reaching various rally points before meeting up can give a quick recovery to a chaotic circumstance. Unless the disaster calls for you to ride it out, like with a tornado or some other such disaster, those first moments can determine whether a disaster is manageable or filled with regret.

Efficiency – Considering response time is one the most vital elements for successfully reacting to a disaster, a well-developed kit will require a plan that provides each member of your party with a set of responsibilities so that they do not have to figure it out on the fly. Setting up a series of rally points or keeping a well-stocked and organized bug out bag on hand will only go so far if you have to figure out the steps after your party meets up on the spot.

Moreover, if everyone knows what they are supposed to do and has a specific set of tasks, your party as a whole can accomplish more in the limited amount of time before bugging out or hunkering down than one or two people could alone. Remember, children can contribute too–just make sure their tasks do not strain them physically as their endurance levels are likely not as developed as the adult party members

Reason vs Instinct – People are constantly saying that the best answer is usually your first thought. This may be true when you are in a safe and comfortable situation without the threat of injury or death, but when survival is on the line, people’s instincts usually do not serve them any better than a random guess.

However, if you take the time to develop a plan of action for when disaster strikes, you will be more likely to keep a cool head, reason through the risks, and determine an appropriate course of action. Remember, anyone in a profession that involves risk of bodily harm trains for hundreds, sometimes thousands, of hours to develop the kind of mindfulness necessary to make rational decisions in high-stress scenarios.

Supplies – Once a disaster strikes, what you have on hand is likely the only supplies you will be able to procure. In fact, even if you have some warning, there is a good chance that a run on supplies by unprepared people will likely clean out your local stores in record time, not to mention delay you further from escaping or hunkering down as the situation calls.

That is why you should make sure that you have a fully stocked and packed bug out bag for every member of your party–ready and waiting to go the second it is needed. Keep in mind, having your supplies packed in an easily reachable place is just as important as having the supplies in the first place.

Self-Reliance – Despite what you may see on news reports during a disaster, most assistance that people receive occurs well after the disaster has already passed. As heartening as it is to witness neighbors from the surrounding region pitch in to help out those caught in an unfortunate event, they generally only do so once their own safety can be secured.

As sad as it may seem, you cannot rely on government institutions or other authorities to come to your aid when disaster strikes. Chances are, they are already overwhelmed with calls for similar relief. Moreover, charities and NGOs generally begin their relief after the danger has passed as well.

Things to Consider When Making an Emergency Plan

As alluded to earlier, a solid emergency plan includes far more than simply a bug out bag with all of the supplies necessary for a few days. The plan should account for all the steps each party member will need to take before, during, and after the immediate danger has passed. This can be broken up into three sections.

Pre Planning – This is arguably the most important part of an emergency plan. This is the point when you figure out where the party will meet up depending on their dispersion. Moreover, the different members should understand their assigned tasks as well as the routes and location should you need to leave the area.

In the Mix – Once it comes time to put your plan into action, you will need the members of your party to respond without hesitation. That is why it is important that your party actually runs through the plan before a disaster strikes, ideally to the point that it becomes muscle memory, so that no time is wasted when rubber meets the road.

Survival – Depending on the disaster, you may well be without many of the modern amenities so many people have come to rely upon for their daily survival. That is why you need to know how to survive in the wild for extended periods of time. Various survival skills like building a shelter, starting a fire, and securing food and water are vital.

You can find an easy to read checklist packed with tips and necessities for a proper emergency plan at Survivor’s Fortress.

Conclusion

Just remember, your actual plan is every bit as important, if not more so, than your bug out supplies. While planning may not provide that immediate rush of accomplishment or sense of satisfaction that a well-prepared bug out bag can, supplies without a plan can only take you so far.

Keep in mind, your plan needs to account for all stages of disaster response. If you are bugging in, your plan may not involve as many steps, but each step is just as vital to ensuring your survival. Moreover, every party member needs to know the different roles and tasks to be accomplished.

With a thoughtful plan that considers numerous types of disasters, includes a variety of redundancies, and maintains the ability to improvise if necessary, you and your party should feel confident in its ability to handle whatever the world throws at it.

Further Reading:

Hunting Tents And Everything You Need To Know About Them

If you’re in the market for a new hunting tent, you might want to make sure you are getting the right one for the job. There are different types of tents and they all have something different to offer. In this article we will be looking at the various types of existing hunting tents and what sets them apart. Once you acquire this knowledge you will be able to easily find the best canvas tents of 2017 or any other tent that suits your needs and requirements. With that said, let us waste no more time and start looking at the different types of tents available on the market.

Truck tents

The name for this type of tent isn’t accidental as it derives from the implication of your truck’s bed into the mix. Unlike other tents, this one is specially made so that it fits in your truck’s bed and makes it a living space altogether. It’s quite an interesting buy and definitely a very benefic one that will allow you to have a tent ready to go while you’re on the move. Keep in mind however that a truck tent isn’t a solo mission and installing it is a two man job. So unless you have a hunting buddy, this might be difficult to use.

Winter tents

In the winter, the rules of the game change and many people feel like they’re freezing to death in their regular tents. You can avoid becoming one of them by staying warm enough in the winter time. That can be done with the help of a winter tent which is specially designed to keep warm in and the cold out. If you plan on doing more than just wait around in your hunting tent, you should know that winter tents usually come with stove vents.

Tree tents

Tree tents are rather new to the party in comparison with all the other available tent models, but it promises a really great design and experience. With tree tents, you can have your tent hover over the ground and even lift it at a respectful distance from the soil. You would want to do this when the ground is not leveled and actually having to lay on it, tent or not, would be sure to inflict some physical pain. All that can be avoided however as the tree tent is great for using three suspensions wrapped around the trees to pull and make the tent float.

All weather tents

The name of this one might have given away its main prowess, which is the fact that it can be used in virtually any season or weather. These tents are made to last a long time thanks to how resistant they are to all forms of weather from snowing and raining to the chilly winds and over-hot heat waves. The last thing you want on your mind when you’re in the tent is the weather, but luckily you won’t have to as this type of tent is bound to keep you safe.

Forget Farm To Fork – Urban Foraging: The Ultimate in Local Eating

Many of us have grown accustomed to making a list of foods we want, then heading to the grocery store to buy them. Others have embraced the trend of community-supported agriculture by signing up for shares or participating in community gardens. And then there are the daring folks who march out into urban environments to scope out their next meal.

People who are unfamiliar with the practice of urban foraging may view it as the work of a few unconventional individuals, but in reality, people have been foraging since the beginning of civilization. Today, the practice is enjoying a worldwide resurgence. Even the restaurant scene has gotten in on the action, as more and more chefs incorporate foraged foods into their menus to produce unique and sustainable fare.1

Foraging may also aid national efforts to reduce hunger. University of California, Berkeley, researchers are experimenting with a program that maps edible plants in low-income neighborhoods to empower local residents to find food near their homes.2 Many foragers also donate some or all of their finds to local food pantries.

If you want to know more kitchen tips, you better visit this site.

The basic concept behind urban foraging is simple: search for and gather fresh food in urban spaces.3 Practitioners embrace foraging as a way to reconnect with the natural world, obtain free food, reduce their eco-footprint, diversify their diets, and learn to look at urban spaces in new ways. Not to be confused with dumpster diving, foraging focuses on obtaining fresh food straight from the source – whether from trees, bushes, edible weeds, or other plants found in parks, abandoned lots, and local neighborhoods.4

Ever felt curious about seeking out your own food in your local environment but held back because you didn’t know where to start? Consider this your cheat sheet for entering the wild world of urban foraging.

Know What’s Safe to Eat

This point really can’t be stressed enough. Not all plants are safe for human consumption, and eating the wrong plant (or the wrong part of an otherwise-safe plant) can result in illness or even death.5That’s why it’s critical to research safe plants in your area and learn how to effectively identify them and their parts. It’s particularly helpful to shadow an experienced forager the first several times you head out so you can learn from their know-how. Regardless of whether you forage solo or with a friend, never eat a plant unless you can identify it with absolute certainty.

A Guide to Urban Foraging: Plants to Look For

While you research the plants native to your area, it can be helpful to familiarize yourself with their Latin names. Common names aren’t consistent across the board, and there are even instances where a plant shares a common name with a poisonous plant. Write down the Latin names of the plants you’re searching for on a particular day, and then bring along a field guide for proper identification.6

Scout Different Locations

A Guide to Urban Foraging: Where to Look

Before picking anything, do some research to figure out where foraging is and is not allowed in your area. In particular, check with local government for any rules regarding foraging on public land.7 If you have your eye on plants that reside on private property, always ask permission before foraging. (If nobody’s home, consider leaving a note with your contact information.8 ) Take note of what grows where and when; foraging is a seasonal enterprise.9 If you encounter a plant that’s past its prime, make a note to return to that same spot earlier next year.

Modern foragers can also use the Internet to identify prime foraging spots. Head to fallingfruit.org, which allows foragers from across the globe to share the locations of found fruits, vegetables, herbs, and nuts, to the tune of more than 800,000 entries from 50 countries.10 The searchable map is free to use online and the founders have also created an app for both Android and Apple.

Check out more fitness stuff here

No matter how you identify possible foraging locations, it’s important to investigate whether the area has been sprayed with herbicides or pesticides, or is located near an industrial area. Avoid plants from these areas, because they’re likely to be contaminated with chemicals that aren’t good for you. In general, try to avoid plants growing near busy roads or train tracks, or in soil that is contaminated with lead (such as at the site of a demolished house). It’s also best to steer clear of auto shops, gas stations, and factories.11 In contrast, empty lots or wooded areas can often be great sources for forage-friendly foods.12

Be Prepared

If you’re setting out to forage, it’s helpful to wear sturdy shoes and bring along some gardening gloves, a spade, a field guide to local plants, and a couple of reusable bags to transport your loot.13 Come prepared with knowledge about the best way to harvest plants so they’ll stay fresh until you get home.14

Respect Some Basic Rules

Part of reconnecting with the land includes developing an appreciation for all the ways nature sustains us – and it’s important to demonstrate that appreciation by treating the earth with respect. Keep the following rules in mind wherever and whenever you forage.

  • If you come across a small patch of a plant species, don’t pick all of the plants. Instead, leave several behind so the species can continue to grow in that location.15
  • Do not to take more than you can use: One of the goals of foraging is to eliminate, not contribute to, food waste.16 On a similar note, don’t harvest the whole plant if you’re only going to use a specific part, such as the leaves.
  • No matter what, don’t harvest or dig up the roots of a threatened species.17 Feel free to remove invasive species from an area, as they’re not doing the local ecosystem any good.

Use Common Sense When it Comes to Food Safety

A Guide to Urban Foraging: How to Forage for Food

If you’re wondering about the safety of foraged foods from urban areas, take solace in this: One study conducted in Boston found that foraged foods were no more dangerous to eat than conventional produce. And in some cases, they actually contained more micronutrients.18

Of course, this is just one study from one city. But common sense can help protect you from major food safety hazards. Know how to identify safe plants, scout locations according to the guidelines above, avoid plants that appear to be unhealthy, and thoroughly rinse your harvest before consuming. By practicing these basic tenets and trusting your gut, you’ll maximize your chances of foraging in a healthy way.19

Even as you digest all the serious pointers outlined above, keep in mind that foraging is ultimately meant to be exciting and fun. (Consider it the adult version of a scavenger hunt.) So get out there with your field guide and marvel at all the food nature provides – even in the concrete jungle.


Source: Fix.com Blog

Sources:

  1. http://experience.usatoday.com/food-and-wine/story/news-festivals-events/food/2014/01/27/foraging-chefs-dishes-trend/4817825/
  2. http://grist.org/food/can-urban-foraging-actually-feed-poor-people/
  3. https://canberraurbanforaging.wordpress.com/about/
  4. http://www.urbanfarmonline.com/sustainable-living/eat-local/5-rules-for-urban-food-foraging.aspx
  5. http://www.urbanfarmonline.com/sustainable-living/eat-local/5-rules-for-urban-food-foraging.aspx
  6. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/02/foraging-tips-dos-and-donts_n_3367633.html
  7. http://www.urbanfarmonline.com/sustainable-living/eat-local/foraging-tips.aspx
  8. http://www.urbanfarmonline.com/sustainable-living/eat-local/5-rules-for-urban-food-foraging.aspx
  9. http://kwgn.com/2015/09/17/foraging-app-created-by-boulder-men-helps-you-find-all-the-free-food-around-you-2/
  10. http://www.shareable.net/blog/how-to-be-an-urban-fruit-forager
  11. http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/August-2011/Urban-Foraging-Tips-How-to-Find-Your-Dinner-in-Chicagos-Wild/
  12. http://www.npr.org/2011/04/18/135412640/foraging-the-weeds-for-wild-healthy-greens
  13. http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/August-2011/Urban-Foraging-Tips-How-to-Find-Your-Dinner-in-Chicagos-Wild/
  14. http://www.urbanfarmonline.com/sustainable-living/eat-local/foraging-tips.aspx
  15. http://netnebraska.org/article/news/nettles-milkweed-and-dandelion-its-whats-dinner-some-urban-nebraskans
  16. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/02/foraging-tips-dos-and-donts_n_3367633.html
  17. http://www.urbanfarmonline.com/sustainable-living/eat-local/5-rules-for-urban-food-foraging.aspx
  18. http://www.mnn.com/food/healthy-eating/blogs/urban-foraged-food-found-safe-eat-boston
  19. http://www.npr.org/2011/04/18/135412640/foraging-the-weeds-for-wild-healthy-greens


How to Prepare Fresh Game Meat For Storage

If you’re hunting for meat, the last thing you can afford is for the meat to spoil before you even get it home (or to a processing facility). It’s tough to understand all of the ins and outs of preserving game meat, especially if you’re hunting in warm temperatures.

Here are a few of the most common questions I hear about game preservation:

  • How long should you wait to skin an animal? Do you need to do it immediately?
  • Does the temperature outside matter?
  • How can I keep my meat safe from bears and other predators?

Some of these questions are easier to answer than other. For example, if your hunting grounds are accessible by vehicle, game preservation is a pretty simple process. In fact, there’s really only one step to it: Collect the dead deer or other game animal and haul it to a cooler to be processed as fast as possible.

In the backcountry, or further away from a vehicle, it’s considerably more difficult. However, if you understand the common causes of spoilage and the ways to prevent it, you shouldn’t have any problems. Let’s get started…

What Factors Cause Meat to Spoil?

The biggest cause of meat spoilage is the body heat emitted by the animal itself.

While an animal’s normal internal temperature usually hovers around 99 degrees, this can actually increase once an animal dies. How is that possible?

Well, the animal’s muscles continue to generate heat; without the assistance of a functioning circulatory system, this heat doesn’t circulate properly through the animal’s body.

That’s why the most important thing to do is to lower the meat’s temperature to the temperature of the air around you–once you accomplish this, you’re nearly “home free”.

Should You Skin Your Deer?

Skinning an animal isn’t always necessary–if the outdoor temperature is 40 degrees Fahrenheit or lower, you can simply gut the deer while leaving its hide intact.

Deer are relatively small, so they cool faster than larger game animals.

In warm weather (above 50 degrees), however, you should take special care to skin animals quickly–especially large animals like elk with heavy hides. Removing the hide is essential to cool the meat so it doesn’t spoil.

How to skin wild game

If you need a little guidance on skinning game, I personally really like this resource provided by Outdoor Hill.

Hunting with Arrows

Many expert hunters recommend using a crossbow when you hunt elk and even deer; one reason for this is that an arrow doesn’t harm the meat nearly as much as different types of ammunition.

Bow hunting

Granted, hunting big game with an arrow is easier said than done, but it’s a lot easier with the right crossbow scope.

Should You Hang the Carcass?

Yes, you should hang the carcass up. Air circulation is essential to quick-cool meat, and hanging is the best way to accomplish an all-around circulation.

Should you hang wild game kills?

This doesn’t mean however that you need to hang the deer very high–remember, the air is cooler lower to the ground.

Should You Gut Your Game?

It’s tough to gut large game animals such as elk–you don’t want to be knee-high in blood and guts, after all.

A better method is to slit the hide from tail to head. Then you can skin the upper half, remove all legs, and debone the ribs, neck, and brisket.

Should You Bone the Carcass?

If you’re carrying the meat for a long distance, boning can make a huge different in the amount of weight you’ll be carrying.

Boning the meat also ensures that it will cool quicker, which will prevent spoilage. At the very least, you should remove the biggest portions of bone, such as the shoulders and hips; these large bones can maintain the heat within the carcass for hours after death.

Although some argue that boning the meat will expose it to more dirt and cause the meat to dry out, it’s an easy problem to solve: you just need to bag the meat and seal it well.

Preventing Excess Moisture

Next to heat, bacteria is one of the most common culprits when it comes to spoilage. The bacteria that spoils meat thrive best in wet environments.

While you should still wash the meat, you should wipe it dry and leave it out to dry in the air for awhile before you bag it.

Keeping the Meat Clean

If you’re hunting in the cold weather, you most likely won’t have to deal with flies. In higher temperatures, though, they’re a formidable opponent.

how to store willd game meat

If you’re hunting in warm weather, you should bag all skinned meat as soon as possible. Invest in high-quality, compact and easy-to-carry bags.

What About Air Temperature?

Once you’re able to extinguish the carcass’s natural body heat, the temperature of the air around you is not much of an issue. If you’re hunting in hot temperatures, however, this article from Field and Stream has handy tips to keep your meat fresh.

As long as you can cool the meat to 40 degrees, time is one your side. Most commercial butchers age their beef or game for a few weeks; they quick-age beef even faster, and at a higher temperature.

Bear Safety

Although it’s understandable to want to keep your meat (and yourself) safe from bears, it’s unlikely that you’ll be able to hang an animal carcass at a “bear-proof” height: bears can reach 10 feet or higher.

Your best bet is to skin, bone, then bag the meat as quickly as possible; this will lessen the time that the animal’s scent will dissipate through the air, attracting bears and other predators.

Most Important Takeaways

If you’re hunting for meat, as opposed to sport, these are important rules to follow. Don’t sabotage your efforts and your health by allowing meat to get dirty, infected, or spoiled by the natural body heat reserved in it after death.

Here are the most important things to remember to keep your game meat fresh, especially if you’re hunting without a vehicle nearby:

  • Skin the animal as quickly as possible, this will help the meat cool to the outside temperature.
  • You should, at the very least, remove all large bones. They will weigh you down, and they cause the meat to retain more heat for longer.
  • Wash and hang your meat to dry.
  • Bag your meat as soon as possible, especially if you are in a warmer climate, or you are in an area known to be populated with bears and other predatory animals.

I wish you the best of luck properly preserving the game meat that you hunt. Let me know if you have any questions, comments, or ideas of your own in the section below. Happy hunting!

Chris Browning is the senior editor of Gun News Daily. The site was originally built by his father who used it as a resource center for people looking to learn more about gun education and safety. This legacy was carried on by Chris, who relaunched the magazine in 2015 and began to rebuild GND.

For the bulk of his career, Chris worked as a private military contractor for a number of NGOs. He is currently living outside Loveland, Colorado where he runs GND and a local coffee shop. Chris is also actively involved in the local community where he runs annual skeet shooting events.

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6 Life Saving Things You Need When Lost In The Forest While Hunting Deer

Photo credit: Shutterstock.com

It is often said that hunting is man’s most exhilarating sport and that statement is pretty much on the money. The adrenaline pumping through the veins mixed with the intensity of focusing on a live animal is heart stopping. Deer is one of the most hunted animals and also one of the most difficult to shoot. The slightest of movements or the faintest of sounds could be the difference between a clean shot and fruitless hunt.

But ever too often, unprepared hunters are caught unawares of their surroundings and find themselves lost in the forest or woods. Although their instincts play a vital role in getting out safely, there are some other tools that could make the great escape a lot easier. Let’s take a look at what to use when you are lost in the forest while hunting deer.

Water Filtration Device

Humans can live without food for a couple of weeks, but without water, their chances of survival begin to dwindle down rapidly. While there are plenty of water sources in the forest, it is important to filter it before drinking as it could contain dirt, dead insects, animal dropping, and other impurities.

One of the easiest filtration systems you could use is a piece of cloth. Just wrap the cloth around the mouth of a container and slowly fill it. The tiny fibers in the cloth will keep out most impurities and leave you with water suitable for drinking.

If you can’t use cloth, find a piece of bamboo or a hollow log and let the water sit for a couple of hours till all the dirt settles at the bottom. To get fresh water, you could even soak up the morning dew on plants and grass using a cloth and drink that directly.

Food Source

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One might think that with so much greenery around, finding food would be as easy as pluck and eat, but that could lead to some serious problems. Mother nature has a way of hiding our weaknesses in the most inconspicuous of places. Like the Oleander plant and its beautiful flowers.

One bite of this deadly flower and you could end up in a coma. It’s always best to trust the trees and plants you know like fruits and vegetables. Many berry plants are poisonous, but if you find one that you are certain is safe to eat, store as much as you can. It is the same with flowers and fruits. If the forest you are hunting in has a stream running through it, set a trap for fish and other aquatic animals.

Fire Making Skills And Tools

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Ever since the Neanderthals mastered fire making, it has been an integral part of any survival routine. Not only does it provide heat, light, and protection from wildlife, it is used for cooking meats, fish, and vegetables. It is also a great way to get rid of any harmful impurities in the collected water by boiling it.

If you find yourself stranded in a forest, the art of preparing a fire could give you that hope to make it through the night and look for civilization in the morning. Collect as much wood as you can to ensure the fire lasts through the night.

Look for dry stones and will help you create a spark needed to start the fire. Or if you have perfected the twig-on-twig method, keep a lot of dry grass or hay to hold the ember and light the fire.

Warm Dry Clothes

The importance of having proper protection in the form of warm clothing out in the wilderness could not be stressed more. Insulated clothing ensure that even when a fire is not available, your body temperature remains at a normal level.

A heavy, waterproof jacket is a must, along with other clothing beneath it. If there is a situation that requires you swimming through cold water, remove and store all your inner wear in a water resistant backpack and immediately put them back on once on the other side.

Useable Tools

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It is important to carry a number of different tools that could help get you out of a sticky situation in the forest.

A Swiss Army Knife and its plethora of attachments is a classic tool that can be used for things like cutting, clipping, digging, and even picking out last lunch from your teeth.

For bigger situations, a hunting knife or dagger work wonders. Whether it’s to cut away vines and branches or to prepare your freshly caught dinner, a knife goes a long way in helping you survive the wild.
Out in the wild, insects are in abundance and they can be extremely harmful is not prepared. Carrying repellent is vital, but if forgotten, there are plenty of plants that can be used. Crushing leaves of certain plants and smothering yourself with it could keep away ants, mosquitoes, ticks, and other harmful bugs.

A rangefinder for hunting purposes is useful for determining the distance between you and the animal you’re after and getting a good shot off. But it can also come in handy when checking the distance to a nearby mountain or a cabin in the distance.

Going hand in hand with a rangefinder is a compass. Not only do you need to know the distance of an object, but also its direction.

 

Shelter Materials

The forest is a dangerous place to be, especially at night. Insects are the least of your worries with bears, mountain lions, wild boars, snakes, and more calling it their home. Having a place to safely stay out of the way of these creatures ensures that you don’t become somebody’s dinner.

If you know you’re in a place that doesn’t have animals like bears around, you’re safe to build a shelter on the forest floor. Gather as many branches, twigs, and dry leaves as you can and make a tent-like shelter a few feet away from the fire.

If you can find trees with large horizontal branches, you could protect yourself from bears and mountain lions by securing yourself to the trunk and branch high above the ground. Sitting up and sleeping doesn’t sound too comfortable, but it is safe.

About the Author: Alex Ramsey

Work hard & live to hunt! Countryman Hunter , Archery, shooter, Freelance outdoor writer and Love USA. founder of Thebigdeer.co where I share my hunt experiences with all, about guns, showcase real gear & real reviews to help you become more prepared. Knowledge will save you, but great gear will help! Let Get Out & Go Hunting

 

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