Water – Our Liquid Friend

Water is important to any survival situation. We need it in our daily lives and even more so in a disaster scenario. Please enjoy this collection of infographics that highlight all of the wonderful benefits that our liquid friend provides us.

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Water: Nature’s Cure-All?

Water: Nature's Cure All?

Water: Nature’s Cure-All?

Aside from quenching your thirst, drinking the right amount of water can benefit your overall health in countless other ways. From aiding weight loss to boosting productivity, let’s look at how water can improve your health.

We Are Water

… well, we’re mostly water.

60%

Proportion of water in adult human body (1)

How much water is in … (2, 3)

Blood: 92%

Brain: 73%

Heart: 73%

Lungs: 83%

Skin: 64%

Muscles: 79%

Kidneys: 79%

Bones: 31%

Nature’s Wonder Drug

Water’s basic functions include regulating body temperature, flushing waste and moving nutrients through our cells. But what can that mean for some of the most important illnesses and health issues? (4, 5, 6)

Aids digestion

60 million

Americans affected by digestive disorders (7)

Improves circulation

Helps create saliva

Reducing appetite

$60 billion

Annual U.S. consumer spending on weight loss efforts (8)

Providing fuel for muscles

Moisturizing skin

Clears skin of toxins

Facilitating kidney function

1 in 10

U.S. adults with some form of chronic kidney disease (9)

Boosts productivity and ramps up brain power

Preventing muscle cramps and strains

Prevents tiredness

30%

Adults who get less than 6 hours of sleep on the average night (9)

Relieving minor illnesses

Drinking It In

About 20% of our water intake comes from foods like fruits and vegetables. That means the rest comes from the beverages we drink. (4)

Good news, then, that water is the most popular beverage in the U.S., recently eclipsing soda for the top spot.

Average annual consumption in gallons (10)

Soda: 44

Water: 58
It’s not all plain water, though. Many Americans are getting their fill of water thanks in part to the myriad “flavored” waters on the market.

People who reported drinking any flavored water in the past week, in millions (11)

Spring 2010: 8.92

Autumn 2010: 8.57

Spring 2011: 8.69

Autumn 2011: 8.13

Spring 2012: 7.68

Autumn 2012: 8.07

Spring 2013: 8.96

1 in 5

U.S. households that buy bottled water and liquid flavor enhancers (12)

These enhancers often contain additives like salt, dyes and other chemicals. A better option is going natural. Don’t like the taste of water? Consider adding: (13, 14)

A few chunks of frozen fruit

Mint ice cubes

A slice of citrus

Mashed berries

Unsweetened fruit juice

Sliced cucumber

Source: Master-of-Health-Administration.com

Water: Nature's Cure All

Sources:
1. http://www.mayoclinic.org
2. http://water.usgs.gov
3. http://www.waterinfo.org
4. http://www.webmd.com
5. http://www.lhj.com
6. http://science.howstuffworks.com
7. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov
8. http://money.usnews.com
9. http://www.cdc.gov
10. http://www.cbsnews.com
11. http://www.statista.com
12. http://abclocal.go.com
13. http://www.everydayhealth.com
14. http://www.shape.com

No Gutters On Your House – Create a “Drain Barrel” (Rainwater Collection System)

Picture of Gutterless Rain Barrel - DIY
DIY rainwater collection system
make your own rain collection system
water containers
drain  barrel steps
This is a great idea for capturing rainwater for your home, garden or even at your bugout location. It comes in handy in places where you may not be able to tap a well or water source directly.
I wanted to share instructions on how to build a “drain barrel” for those of you who may not have gutters on your house.  This project is most useful for those of us who have a clearly-defined gouge in our wood chips where the water pours off the roof.

Step 1:

Step 1 to build your own rainwater collection system
Purchase three cedar decking boards and screw them together in the shape of a trough. Seal all joined edges with a clear silicone caulk.

Step 2:

Step 2 to build your own rainwater collection system
Obtain containers in which the capture the rainwater; it would be best to find containers with about a 2″ opening.

Step 3:

Step 3 to build your own rainwater collection system
Line up the containers and measure the distance between the center of the containers’ openings. Leave about 1/2″ per container for expansion.  Measure the diameter of the container’s opening and use a hole saw (attached to the drill) to make holes in the trough.

Step 4:

Step 4 to build your own rainwater collection system
Purchase a 10′ length of PVC pipe. It should be slightly less in diameter than your hole. Count the number of holes and divide evenly. Cut the PVC into equal lengths.  Purchase a narrowing PVC conduit to glue to the top of your pipes.  Drill two holes in the widest part of the conduit and use a miter saw to remove the material between the holes. This will make a slit to help drain the water into the pipe and ultimately into your container.

Step 5:

Step 5 to build your own rainwater collection system
Construct some simple “feet” to attach to the ends of the trough. If you drill a hole in the middle of the end of the trough, you will be able to swivel the trough up-side-down on the lag bolt to prevent snow from weighing the trough down during the winter.  Dig a hole on both ends for the “feet”, level the trough, and add concrete to prevent the structure from moving during a hard rain.

Step 6:

Step 6 to build your own rainwater collection system
Rake the area under the trough so that you can remove the containers easily. Insert the PVC pipe, and add metal menders if you like to ensure the container’s slit stays level with the trough. When it rains, the water will be directed from the trough, into the PVC pipe and then into your container.  When the container is full, lift the PVC pipe out of the mouth of the container, remove the container, and water your plants.  When the container is empty, put it back under the trough and slip the PVC pipe back down into the mouth of the container.  If you like, you can purchase a rain barrel with which to pour the full containers.

 

Water, Dehydration and You

Not drinking enough water can have some very serious effects on your body, especially in a survival situation. This infographic is about the importance of water for human body The dehydration and the implications for the body of the people. 

Water

by sebamelchor.
Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

Water More Valuable Than Gold?

What Does a 20% Water Reduction Look Like?

At some point in the future, maybe the near future, fresh water will become a scarce commodity. In fact, many predict that it will surpass oil, gas and even gold as the most sought after commodity in the world. There are many things you can do to reduce waste or conserve what you have collected.

The infographic below outlines how much can be saved right now:

What does a 20% water reduction look like?

Use The Sun To Disinfect Water – Solar Water Disinfection

Solar Water Disinfection

This is a very simple and effective solution to clean drinking water: Contaminated water is filled into transparent plastic bottles and exposed to full sunlight for six hours.
Sunlight is treating the contaminated water through two synergetic mechanisms: Radiation in the spectrum of UV-A (wavelength 320-400nm) and increased water temperature. If the water temperatures raises above 50°C, the disinfection process is three times faster.

In a survival situation, you are bound to come across discarded clear plastic bottles. This tip could come in handy. You should also carry other means to purify water for drinking.

Ever Heard Of Hyponatremia?

We all worry about dehydration.

Did you know there are extreme dangers associated with a phenomenon called Hyponatremia?

In simple terms this is over hydration and can actually cause death. Generally this is associated with lack of food, and drinking large amounts of fluid during extreme or endurance physical activity. This can cause the body’s salt levels to drop dramatically and cause body cells to swell and leak into the bloodstream. A person can suddenly suddenly collapse. Coma or death are genuine concerns.

Let it be known that the symptoms of over hydration are similar to dehydration. Hydrating with water only worsens the situation. Simply put the easiest way to tell the difference between hyponatremia and dehydration symptoms is to look for swelling of the fingers, joints, wrists. Also watch for ring and watch tightness due to excessive swelling.

In patients with severe hyponatremia (serum sodium <125 mEq/L), central nervous system symptoms predominate and can progress to seizures, coma, or death.

Other neurological symptoms include:
  •       Headache
  •       Muscle cramps
  •       Reversible ataxia
  •       Psychosis
  •       Lethargy
  •       Restlessness
  •       Disorientation
  •       Apathy
  •       Anorexia
  •       Agitation
 
Neurological symptoms are generally less common in patients with chronic or mild hyponatremia (serum sodium >125 mEq/L).
 
Nonneurological symptoms of hyponatremia include:
  •       Fatigue
  •       Thirst
  •       Weakness
  •       Cramping
  •       Nausea
  •       Vomiting
  •       Bloating
  •       Swelling
  •       Tightness of hands and feet

Some simple tips: Try to snack from time to time before and during the activity. It usually only takes small amounts of salt found in most foods to rebalance your system. Sports drinks work well. Try to prehydrate before exercising then continue to drink appx a cup of fluid every 20 to 30 minutes.

 

Authors note: We possess no personal medical expertise. Our intent is only to briefly inform the reader of a possible dangerous situation. Please speak with a medical professional for more detailed information on this potential life threatening situation.

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