Tips to Choosing the Ideal Tent for Survival Off Grid

You can’t go to a camp site without a tent. This is because you will not have somewhere to lay your head at night or when you just want to rest during the day. With a quality net, you can be sure that you will be protected from the bad elements of weather. Besides that, you will enjoy being able to do certain things in privacy, such as changing into fresh clothes and grooming. However, buying a new tent can be a daunting task, especially when you don’t know what to look for. As a matter of fact, tents come in various shapes and sizes. Selecting the right tent will go a long way towards improving your experience at the campsite. Here is a list of things you should consider when shopping for a tent.

1. Size Matters

Your choice of a tent should be guided by the number of people that it can accommodate. In fact, every tent describes the number of people that can comfortably stay in it. If it’s just you and your spouse, a tent with a capacity of 4 people is highly recommended. This is because you will use the space that’s left to keep your stuff. If you have a bigger family, it’s recommended you narrow down to a king size tent. This helps in ensuring that the occupants are able to move inside without being clumsy. It’s also important you consider the height of the tent, especially if you want to be able to stand inside. A tent with a cubicle design is ideal for such purposes.

2. Easy to Set Up

As an amateur camper, you might get carried away by the looks of various tents. Some tents look very appealing when they are already set up. What the sales people will not tell you is that you can’t set up such tents on your own. In fact, some tents can only be pitched by professionals. Going to a camp with such a tent is a recipe for disaster. This is because you will not be able to set it up fast when you arrive late at the camp or it starts raining. By the rule of thumb, you should select a tent that pops up instantly.

3. Proper Weather Protection

Sleeping under canvas is fun as long as the tent doesn’t allow bad weather to penetrate to the inside.  An ideal tent is one that’s designed to prevent water from penetrating through. Tents made from canvas are usually the best because they are breathable, meaning they allow fresh air to circulate inside while repelling water. Such tents help in maintaining dryness in the inside by encouraging evaporation. Since they are also breathable, they prevent heat from building up. You should also select a tent that’s insulated on the edges to keep cold weather at bay during winter.

4. Price

The price of tent is not constant across various stores. You should actually keep looking until you find a tent that you can afford to pay for. At the end of the day, you will only get what you pay for. This means that a bigger tent and more features will obviously cost more than a smaller tent. Besides that, tents made from canvas cost a premium price due to their durability. On the other hand, those that are made from nylon material tend to be cheaper. The downside is that they need to be replaced every now and then.

Tips on Food Storage for an Emergency

Emergency Food Storage

It is vital to store food for the emergency purpose such as earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, floods, etc.

Emergencies are expected to happen in everyone’s life at any time.

Initial perpetration is essential to face for emergency purpose.

There are many more benefits to storing food for an emergency.

Keep in mind, if something terrible happens, food stores are not going to operate as usual, and you are going to figuring out how to find your supplies.

Stock up on food for emergency

Food You Can Store

The most important thing is to know what are the types of foods that can be stored.

 Following are some kinds of food items that can be stored for emergency.

  1. Canned fruits, vegetables (peaches, pears, berries, corn, beans, carrots)
  2. Canned meat (tuna, beef, mutton)
  3. Unsalted nuts and seeds (almonds, walnuts, cashews)
  4. Crackers (cereal bars, sweet treats)
  5. Pasta
  6. Rice
  7. Peanut butter
  8. Water bottles
  9. Juice and shelf-stable milk or nondairy alternatives
  10. Multivitamins (calcium, fish oil, vitamin C)
  11. Honey

Important Things to Consider

There are several things to consider when storing food for an emergency. Following are the significant things to concentrate,

– A well-organized pantry to store items for an emergency. The pantry should be planned to store food for long term purpose without any harm for food.

– Food security should be considered. When storing for an emergency, it should be stored very safely because at the moment of emergency; it should be safe if it is damaged can not use.

– Long term expiry dates. When purchasing the food items should consider the expiry date, and it should be a long term one to store for a long time.

– Make sure that storing fruits and meats are well dried up to the storing condition — especially when preparing food at home for storing.

– Better to avoid frozen or refrigerated food for emergency purpose. Because these kinds of food items can not keep outside for a long time.

– Store the items for an emergency that are no need of freezing or cooking as well as not taking much time for preparation. 

Plan for your emergency exit

Tips to Remember

There are various tips to store food for emergency purpose. It is essential to know the tips to save correctly, as those things to be used in an emergency.

If it is not stored correctly, no use at the time of crisis.

Following are few tips to remember:

– Food items should be well sealed and packed or canned to avoid damages for the food.

– Properly label and categorize the food items to easy access.

 – Store with proper quantities that are required for your family needs and wants.

– When storing food items do not forget to consider the nutrition values.

– At the same time, give a significant consideration for the tastes and flavors you and your family members prefer.

According to the things mentioned above, purchasing, packaging, and storing properly holds significant importance at storing food items for emergency purpose.

Proper preparation and organization helps to face the emergency with minimum losses.

Author Bio:

Wilfred Chong

Surviveafterend.com

Survival Skills For Kids

Survival Skills for Kids
 

5 Things You Should Know About Buying Food To Stockpile

For most preppers, safety and food security is of paramount importance. Having your own food supply during an emergency or crisis situation will keep you and your family self-sufficient even during the toughest times. How do you build your own stockpile for survival?

foods list for off grid survival

Here are 5 things you should know about buying food to stockpile.

  1. What Is Your Goal?

Before buying food to stockpile, you will need to set your goal. How much stock do you intend to buy? How long do you want the supplies to last? Ideally, your food and water supply should sustain you for at least 72 hours but for peace of mind during an emergency, go beyond the bare minimum.

Start by writing a list of foodstuff that can sustain you and your family for three days. Once you have achieved that goal, keep building until you have enough supplies to last a few months.

  1. Decide On A Stockpile Budget

When buying food to stockpile, it is important to have a budget from the beginning. Determine how much you can afford and how much money you can spare from your weekly shopping to buy food to stockpile.

Make your budget conservative and reasonable. Avoid getting into debt. Know when to stop. There are times when you will have to pass up a great deal to avoid wasting money. Remember to go over your budget before you start shopping. You can always take advantage of store sales and product rebate offers.

foods list for off grid survival, food storage

  1. Invest In Nutritionally Dense Foods

Sometimes, consuming food from a stockpile can get tiring and boring. This is why you will need to invest in a stock that includes nutritionally dense and tasty foods. Consider your family’s taste and make a list of ingredients they will enjoy. Some of the foods to buy include; multivitamins, dried fruits, cereal, canned meat and chicken, nuts and peanut butter.

Don’t buy food items that your family doesn’t eat. Don’t buy food that will go bad before you eat it. Check all the expiry dates and preservatives used to ensure that your food is safe for consumption for the entire period you will need it.

  1. Prioritize On Water

Water is life. Without it, our bodies cannot survive for more than three days. Buy enough water. You should stockpile and safely store at least two weeks supply of water for every individual in your house.

Commercially bottled water is the best choice since it is safe and does not require sanitizing or disinfecting any further. However, it is advisable to consume or replace the water every six months.

foods list for off grid survival, jars and canning your own supply

  1. Prepare Space For Your Stockpile

Stockpiling on food and water will take up a lot of space in your pantry. Before you head out shopping, ensure that you clean and prepare the space. If you intend to store the food in the basement, ensure that your basement is cool and dry.

Remember, seepage, mice or mold can make your entire stock of food unsafe. You can invest in additional storage shelving or identical boxes that take up minimum space.

Conclusion

There you have it. 5 important things you should know about buying food to stockpile. To find out more on foods list for off grid survival go to simplyoffgrid.com for more information.  

Why Trapping Is Essential for Long-Term Survival

We’ve all seen those “survival” shows, claiming that one dude can wildly run around the woods, procuring all the necessities of sustenance through fashioning a makeshift spear from an old boat propeller and skewering a 10-point buck …but entertaining as that is, it just doesn’t work like that.

Securing meat sources is not one of those parts of bugout life you simply leave to chance “because we saw them do it on TV”, so thinking that we’ll be able to remain fat and happy only off an abundance of hares might not be productive. And, even if this were possible for the best of the backwoods experts, the rest of us need to consider the fact that we may not be that good. Being forced to learn such a craft during a survival situation is certainly not an optimal scenario.

However, even thinking that we’ll be able to make the tree line by the crack of dawn, carrying only ye olde’ Ruger 10/22, and taking home enough meals to feed the mobile homestead may probably be a disappointing fallacy, as well. Depending on where you live and how abundant game may be in your area, there’s a good chance you’re going to have to throw out all the stops in your quest to feed you and especially your loved ones.

trap

This is why learning the ancient art, wilderness methods, and backwoods traditions of trapping should be one of your top priorities. That is, if you want to sustain yourself on more than just the MREs you brought along for the ride.

Trapping Depends on Your Kit

It should be said right off the bat that not every type of bugout bag requires a comprehensive trapping kit. In fact, you might even be doing more harm than good if you load up your 72-hour emergency bag with heavy traps, depending on your fitness level and skill.

The reason I would not ordinarily advocate bringing along a long-term trapping kit in your 72-hour bag is simply because of the philosophy behind the scenario. Your 72-hour bag is simply meant for a temporary survival situation, in which you are hoping to be found and rescued shortly thereafter. Carrying along a large trapping kit doesn’t make sense, and that weight would better serve you if it were replaced by medical supplies, food, and signaling options.

However, that’s not to say that a modestly small trapping kit isn’t worth the weight entirely. Though, snares are considered a ‘low-probability’ trap, meaning that it is unlikely you’ll snag Peter Rabbit with one…if you set 20, you might just snag his brother too.

The strength of using lightweight snares is that these traps are nothing but rigged metal wires or cables (depending on what cable-weight suits your strategy). This shouldn’t take up large amounts of space and won’t weigh you down. In addition, they can also be used for other applications.

In the event that you lose your cordage, snares would do just fine in a pinch. They can be great for making shelter, trip cords, hafting, and if you were good enough to bring only stainless steel containers, you can use snares to hang your water bottle over the fire for boiling and cooking.

The weakness of using snares is their tendency to serve as a ‘one-time-use-only’, kind of trap. If the wrong critter happens to wander into the snare, which was set to catch a meal half its size, then you can pretty much say goodbye to that setup. Especially in freezing temperature scenarios, snares can even become brittle. When that happens, all bets are off.

Long-Term Sustenance and Heavier Traps

While snares are a great way to go in a short-term scenario, your long-term strategy should include substantially more trapping gear than that. Remember, even if you brought along 30 snares, depending on the kind of game wandering through your area (which isn’t always possible to know off the bat), you might tear up all your snares within a week.

One of my favorite kinds of traps is the Conibear, which is considered a ‘body grip’ trap. Fortunately for those of us who are lovers of the backwoods and of the creatures who dwell therein, Conibear traps offer one of the most humane methods of the craft, offering almost a total likelihood of instant dispatch for the critter. Simply put, it wanders into the trap, trips it, and our furry MRE wakes up in small game heaven.

In addition, these traps are considered a ‘high probability’ trap, meaning that if something wanders into it – well, then that critter’s goose is definitely cooked. Unlike snares, where the animal has a fairly high chance of escaping (or being taken by a hawk, who’s probably laughing all the way back to its nest), Conibear traps will kill instantly, and secure the animal until you come and harvest.

It is usually recommended that you carry an assortment of #110, #120, and #220 Conibear traps, as each number indicates its size and spring-strength. The smaller #110’s are usually good for little critters, such as squirrels and rabbits, but the heftier #220’s will even snag a beaver. Strategize accordingly, but be aware that the bigger the trap, the harder it snaps, which increases your likelihood of broken fingers and lots of cussing–if handled carelessly, that is.

Also, bear in mind that if you bring along a trapping kit for sustained wilderness self-reliance, then you will need to be mentally and physically prepared to carry the additional weight. While the #110’s are a pound, and #220’s only weigh in at 2lbs, that weight can add up quickly.

Trapping Beauty

In this glorious age of modern trapping methods and gear, we now have traps that are rather easy to set, will last two decades if maintained, and are far more reliable than in the olden days. Of course, we’ve all heard the legends of Davy Crockett-types, ramblin’ through the woods with a musket and moccasins–but even these guys trapped to survive and make a living.

Simply put, trapping offers the survivalist, backwoodsman, bushcrafter, and explorer the means by which to hunt… without being present. Set enough traps (the proper way of course), and you’ve increased your chances of harvesting meat from the land. Do this while hunting or fishing, and you’ve increased your chances even higher. If you don’t use traps and rely only on hunting, then you’ve left your survival to the hard chance that game will just so happen to blunder into your sights–within range–and present you with a somewhat clean shot.

By the way, it might also be worthy to mention: traps will kill silently. Food for thought.

The understanding behind trapping is that it’s based on the concept of residual returns through increasing your chances, elevating your probability of acquiring meat sources. The more traps you bring, the better your chances. If frontiersmen thought this was important, then it must have been. Of course, I’d trust a Davy Crockett over “survival dude” any day of the week and twice on Sunday.

 

[source] – American Preppers Network

 



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