5 Things You Should Know About Buying Food To Stockpile

For most preppers, safety and food security is of paramount importance. Having your own food supply during an emergency or crisis situation will keep you and your family self-sufficient even during the toughest times. How do you build your own stockpile for survival?

foods list for off grid survival

Here are 5 things you should know about buying food to stockpile.

  1. What Is Your Goal?

Before buying food to stockpile, you will need to set your goal. How much stock do you intend to buy? How long do you want the supplies to last? Ideally, your food and water supply should sustain you for at least 72 hours but for peace of mind during an emergency, go beyond the bare minimum.

Start by writing a list of foodstuff that can sustain you and your family for three days. Once you have achieved that goal, keep building until you have enough supplies to last a few months.

  1. Decide On A Stockpile Budget

When buying food to stockpile, it is important to have a budget from the beginning. Determine how much you can afford and how much money you can spare from your weekly shopping to buy food to stockpile.

Make your budget conservative and reasonable. Avoid getting into debt. Know when to stop. There are times when you will have to pass up a great deal to avoid wasting money. Remember to go over your budget before you start shopping. You can always take advantage of store sales and product rebate offers.

foods list for off grid survival, food storage

  1. Invest In Nutritionally Dense Foods

Sometimes, consuming food from a stockpile can get tiring and boring. This is why you will need to invest in a stock that includes nutritionally dense and tasty foods. Consider your family’s taste and make a list of ingredients they will enjoy. Some of the foods to buy include; multivitamins, dried fruits, cereal, canned meat and chicken, nuts and peanut butter.

Don’t buy food items that your family doesn’t eat. Don’t buy food that will go bad before you eat it. Check all the expiry dates and preservatives used to ensure that your food is safe for consumption for the entire period you will need it.

  1. Prioritize On Water

Water is life. Without it, our bodies cannot survive for more than three days. Buy enough water. You should stockpile and safely store at least two weeks supply of water for every individual in your house.

Commercially bottled water is the best choice since it is safe and does not require sanitizing or disinfecting any further. However, it is advisable to consume or replace the water every six months.

foods list for off grid survival, jars and canning your own supply

  1. Prepare Space For Your Stockpile

Stockpiling on food and water will take up a lot of space in your pantry. Before you head out shopping, ensure that you clean and prepare the space. If you intend to store the food in the basement, ensure that your basement is cool and dry.

Remember, seepage, mice or mold can make your entire stock of food unsafe. You can invest in additional storage shelving or identical boxes that take up minimum space.

Conclusion

There you have it. 5 important things you should know about buying food to stockpile. To find out more on foods list for off grid survival go to simplyoffgrid.com for more information.  

Survival of the Ready – Preparation is Paramount

Millions of people around the world have to face the trauma and consequences of an unforeseen disaster every year, and tens of thousands lose their lives.

You can rarely predict or avoid a disaster happening but you can often improve your odds of survival.

Ammo.com have put together a comprehensive guide for emergency preparation and looks at key reasons why you need to prepare for an emergency and what steps you can take to prepare.

The guide can show ready you are if disaster strikes.

 

Add Some Paracord to Water Bottles or Make a Paracord Can Koozie

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Here are a couple of examples of adding paracord to water bottles.

A 25 foot length was used for the one in a ‘whipping’ pattern on the aluminum water bottle. And a 40 foot length was used in a woven pattern on the white stainless steel water bottle. Both started off with coiling the cord around the bottles, with the starting end just held in place with a rubber band and later tucked to finish.
The ‘whipping'(snaking) version, an example is seen in Geoffrey Budworth’s The Complete Book of Knots, is easily zigzagged and looped around a couple of coils on each end of the paracord coiled wraps, and tucked to finish.
The woven version resembles ‘grafting’ type knot work, as seen in Stuart Grainger’s ‘Creative Ropecraft’, but is instead a single length of cord. After coiling the cord around the bottle, one end is then worked in an over/under pattern, back up then down, all the way around the bottle. For this pattern, I went under three coils, over three coils, but like ‘grafting’, you can vary the pattern to your own tastes
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I used a Perma-Lok Jumbo Lacing Needle to feed the paracord over/under as I worked, as well as a pair of hemostats/forceps.Here’s a woven paracord can koozie, done with a 25 foot length of cord. The weaving is just like that done on the water bottle, but with the vertical over/under part done closer together for a tighter weave before changing to half hitching on the bottom.
I didn’t have much paracord on hand to work with, so I reused some from the previous project. I would have made the can koozie a little bit taller and fully closed up the bottom, if I’d started with a 30 foot length, and a couple more feet for a cinch cord/drawstring with a cord lock for alternate use as a pouch. It still works alright as it is for holding a soda/beer can…

Top Tip:

For cleaning paracord on a water bottle, hat, or paracord bracelet, I use a little anti-bacterial liquid soap and an old soft bristle toothbrush to get the cord clean, then let air dry or I’ll sometimes take ’em in the shower with me to get everything done in one trip, lol… 🙂

Or,  I just throw my wrapped thermos/cup into the dishwasher. I’ve had it for about 5 months now and it hasn’t been a problem.

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