OmegaMan Tested: EDC Survival Keychain by Survivalhax

EDC Survival Keychain

Field tested by our guest blogger, OmegaMan quoted: “A great little paracord keychain with a ear piercing whistle attached to a durable aluminum case filled with survival essentials!”

EDC Survival Keychain

“This is a great addition to any preppers’ everyday carry (EDC) or bugout bag. Here’s what you will be shocked to find inside the survival case: Fire striker bar & tinder, fishing swivels, fishing float & weights, fishing line & hook, 2 safety pins, a wire saw, and a knife!”

DETAILS:

It’s a key chain, a survival kit, and a waterproof pill container all in 1.

The 10 in 1 Paracord EDC Keychain is a waterproof aluminum EDC (everyday carry) pill bottle.

A durable carabiner and 550 paracord are used so you can take this mini survival kit anywhere.

If you carry your car keys everywhere, you’ll have a much better chance of surviving the apocalypse.

No need for a bug out bag, this is small enough to fit in your pocket.

What’s Inside?

There are technically 11 separate pieces inside the canister. 

  • Fishing line
  • Hooks
  • Weights
  • Floaters
  • Sinkers
  • Swivels
  • Eye knife
  • Cotton tinder
  • Fire starter rod
  • Safety pins
  • Wire saw

The paracord is over 4 feet long when unraveled and has an emergency whistle attached to it.

Our goal was to make a reusable PSK (Personal Survival Kit) that gives you the ability to catch a fish, gut it, and cook it.  Sure there are easier ways to do this, but none that fit on your keychain.

What Can This Mini Survival Kit Do?

From nothing, you can make a Fishing Pole 

  1. Can you find a branch in the woods?  Great you’ve got a fishing pole.
  2. Open your EDC bottle and pull out the fishing line.
  3. Tie the line to one end of your branch or stick.
  4. Attach your hooks to your fishing line.
  5. Add your sinkers and floaters.
  6. Find a bug or worm for bait.
  7. You are now fishing, bushcraft style.

No survival kit would be complete without a way to start a fire.  And in order to start a fire, you need wood. The finger chainsaw can slice through branches with enough elbow grease. Slide two sticks in the finger holes for extra torque.

Contents:

  • 1 x Waterproof EDC container
  • 1 x Paracord
  • 1 x Fishing line
  • 2 x Hooks
  • 2 x Weights
  • 2 x Floaters
  • 2 x Sinkers
  • 2 x Swivels
  • 1 x Knife
  • 1 x Tinder cotton
  • 1 x Fire starter
  • 1 x Saftey Pins
  • 1 x Finger saw
  • 1 x Whistle
  • 1 x Carabiner

Specs:

  • Total length: 9.2 inches
  • Bottle length: 3.3 inches
  • Bottle width: .9 inches
  • EDC bottle material: Aluminum Alloy
  • Paracord length: 3 inches
  • Untied Paracord length: 4 feet
  • Weight: 0.14 pounds

ORDER NOW

Does It Really Take $50,000 To Be A Prepper?

 

What Does it Cost to Prepare

Scouring the internet for information on disaster preparedness sheds an interesting light on what most people think it costs to ready themselves for the unexpected. Guides abound on how to prepare with minimal investments – but most put the focus on unreliable foodstuffs, tools, and supplies.

At the opposite end of the spectrum are the complete “how to” guides, that claim to show a family how to prepare for any emergency. These guides tend to indicate that the total cost of preparing a family of four for a natural disaster ranges from $5,000 to over $50,000.

Preparing for the Worst – Not As Expensive As Most Think

Does It Really Take $50,000 To Be A Survival Prepper?

Preparing for a disaster doesn’t mean that you and your family could survive in an underground bunker for thirty years without ever accessing the outside world. It means preparing for the inevitable and unexpected emergencies that can arise at any time.

Disaster preparedness isn’t limited to hurricanes, blizzards, and failures of the national infrastructure. It extends into the smaller disasters that we encounter while going about our everyday lives – like getting stranded in a broken down vehicle in the middle of nowhere, or finding yourself injured while on a hike.

Preparing for these situations is relatively inexpensive. With the help of products like the Bucket Survival Kits it can be incredibly simple, too.




Preparing for Different Types of Emergencies

While the ideal disaster preparedness plan includes provisions for long periods of isolation from modern amenities (such as running water and food supplies), the majority of emergencies the average person will encounter require far less extensive planning.

Breakdown / Stranded Emergencies – If your vehicle were to break down, or if you found yourself stranded in the middle of nowhere, what would you do? With a ready-made kit, like the Guardian Elite (which comes prepared in a sturdy, easy-to-carry back pack) you would have food, and first aid supplies on hand. Toss in a few bottles of water before you head out, and you’ll have that covered, too.

Temporarily Unavailable Food Supplies – Whether it’s a true natural disaster or merely a predicted blizzard, when the newsman warns that rough weather is moving in, everyone rushes to the grocery store and clears the shelves. Having a one month supply of food on hand would ensure that your family doesn’t go hungry, and with kits like the 240 Serving Meal Package, is not only affordable, but incredibly easy to store.

In both of the cases described above, your total investment is going to be far less than what you might expect. Since the kits are ready made and based on government recommendations for preparedness, you can also be sure that they’re relatively complete.

Don’t put off preparing for disaster because you don’t think you can afford it – it’s far less expensive than you think.

Please share your cost saving prepper and survival ideas in the comments below.


Water Bricks For Survival

Whether you are planning on bugging in, bugging out or have some other survival shelter hidden away, you will need a good stockpile of water. Adding WaterBrick storage in a pantry, a garage or a bunker is a great idea for emergency water storage. And if needed they are more portable than 55 gallon water barrels.

Here are a few examples:

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Tan

Emergency Water Storage System - Stackable Boxes, BPA-Free Bladder, Portable - Disaster Prepper Home Water Supply - With Aquamira Drinking Water Purification & Fill Hose (60 Gallon)

Emergency Water Storage System – Stackable Boxes, BPA-Free Bladder, Portable – Disaster Prepper Home Water Supply – With Aquamira Drinking Water Purification & Fill Hose

 

Water Storage Containers - WaterBrick - 32 Pack Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick Wall – 32 Pack Blue

 

These examples of water storage are practical and easy to use.

  • Stackable rectangular blocks which interlock for stability.
  • Easy to grip handle.
  • Can be used for water or foods like rice, beans, or anything you want to keep safe and dry from the elements.
  • FDA approved, and BPA free.

How To Build Your Own Solar Thermal Panel From Recycled Trash

The guys at the Sietch have a great little idea here, making their own solar thermal collector with spare parts and trash readily available in any scrap yard  worldwide. This would be good if the SHTF and we had to live off the grid. Enjoy. Let us know if you build your own.

Materials needed:

Water
2 buckets
Drill (with both drill bits and screw bits)
Some scissors
A saw (a simple hand saw will do)
Some wood
A pane of glass.
The back of a small refrigerator.
12 feet of air pump hose used in fish tanks
Backing material (we used an old door mat)
A box of wood screws
Aluminum Foil
Role of duct tape
Angle Cutter (or hack saw)
Time:This project took about 3 hours of constructions time. It took a couple weeks to find all the parts.

Now onto the project. The first thing we did was collect all of the parts.

Our local dump has a coolant removal program that has refrigerators and dehumidifiers that they remove old freon from. With this in mind I found the perfect heat collector. The back of a fridge is basically a heat dispersal system, with a slight modification is can be used to collect large amounts of heat.

Make sure that the freon, or other coolant has been removed, and cut the grill off at the base, near the large coolant holder.

There was an old couch that had been run over by one of the large dump plows, the inside wood was the perfect size for the frame.

I found a pane of glass and an old rubber door mat that made the perfect backing and front.

The glass was a real find, and may be the only part of the panel that may need to be purchased. Make sure your glass is big enough to fit over your collector and have enough room to attach it to the frame.

The door mat was HUGE, so I had to cut it in half. Funny thing seems there was a lot of nasty black goo, and a metal sheet in the middle. Who knew. Remove the metal plate (or cut it in half as well) and leave the goo.

Once The backing was cut to size, it was time to start building the frame.

As you can see I sort of built the frame around the collector, leaving enough backing to hold it all together.

The frame is held on by building a similar frame on the back and driving large wood screws through the front frame, the backing and into the back frame.

I added some foil to the backing. The reason for this is that counter to what you would think, you do not want the backing to warm up. You only want the collector to absorb heat (it was so nice of the fridge company to paint it black for us). The foil will take any sun that was not absorbed by the collector on the first pass and bounce it back over the collector for another try at absorption. The glass cover will keep all the heat inside the panel for further absorption.

Light can pass through glass, but heat can not.

Notice how duct tape was used on the inside to seal all cracks, you could use caulk but I didn’t have any so I used the cheapest option. It worked well, and held the foil in place.

Next we cut some notches for the entry and return ports to the collector.

Note again the use of duct tape to seal cracks.

I got some air pump hose from the local fish store and attached them to the end of the entry and return ports.

The duct tape was applied to make sure it was a tight fit, it was later removed as it was not needed.

Next we attached the collector to the backing, using the mounting brackets that came on the fridge and some duct tape. If you wanted you could use some screws and wood, but I found the tape and the natural tension of the construction to be enough to hold it in place.

Lastly we attach the glass to the top. This serves to trap all the infrared radiation from the sun inside our panel where our collector will absorb it. Again light can pass through glass, but heat can not.

As you can see simple duct tape is enough to hold it on. I would recommend using some sort of mounting bracket however as after a couple days in the sun the tape started to droop allowing the glass to slide off. A few screws would solve this, but I am cheap so I just put new tape on.

Set your panel up at an angle so that it catches the most sun.

Here is the gross part, put one end of the hose into your bucket of cold water, and make sure it is at the bottom of the bucket, next grab the return hose and start sucking. That’s right, unfortunately you have to prime the panel by getting some water into it. This can be done without getting water in your mouth, but inevitably I sucked just a little too hard and ended up with a mouth full of nasty water. I would recommend having a friend do this part. 🙂

Set your cold water bucket (source) up higher than your warm water bucket (return) and the whole thing will gravity siphon. Due to the design of this collector (both ports return to the same location on the panel) it will not thermo siphon. For that to happen I would need to cut the long return pipe and have it exit at the top of the panel.

A word of warning, this panel works VERY WELL. We tested it on a very sunny day and within seconds the water coming out of the panel was hot enough TO SCALD. I burned my fingers. This very hot water is only formed when the water inside the panel is allowed to sit for about a minute without moving. If the water is moving (do to the gravity siphon) the water exiting the return pipe is about 110 degrees, and while hot, will not burn you.

The water does not flow through the panel very fast (as the pipes are very small) but that is sort of a good thing as it allows the water to heat up a lot on its journey through the collector. It does take a while to heat up a 5 gallon bucket of water, I ended up building an insulated return bucket that was all black and sealed on the top except for the port where the water tube enters. This kept the returned hot water hot long enough to be of use.

I let this guy run for a couple of hours one hot sunny day and heated up a five gallon bucket of cold water (measured at 70 degrees F) to over 110 degrees F. The temp that day was about 76 degrees F. If the water is allowed to sit in the panel for several minutes and then forced out (by blowing in one of the hoses) the water was measure at 170 degrees F. All in all we are much happier with the performance (and cost) of this panel. It performs much better than the previous one.

Our next modifications to this design will be to alter the return port so that it will thermo siphon, in this way the return hose can be fed into the source bucket and the water will continually circulate in the panel getting hotter and hotter. We have also talked about adding mirrors to the panel to concentrate more heat. Our goal is to boil water. This entire project cost less than five dollars, as I already had the screws, and the duct tape. The only thing I purchased was the air hose, which cost $3.76.

Enjoy the hot water.

 

[source]

How To Tie Fishing Knots

Fishing knots are created to be tied with either a mono or a coated or un-coated braided line and should have the ability to pass through fishing rod eyes and rings as well as a fishing rig. For that reason they need to be as small and as strong as possible. Learning a new knot takes patience and practice. Some knots may seem challenging at the beginning but with some practice you will soon tie all these knots for fishing like a master.

Fishing line knots must be pulled extremely tight before it is used. To ensure fishing knots tighten smoothly, and to help minimize the amount of heat generated, the knot should be moistened with either water or saliva. Trim the ends of all knots closely against the knot. A nail clipper is a very good tool for this purpose.

Some of the most popular knots for fishing include the Palomar Knot (one of the well-known fly fishing knots), Nail Knot, Blood Knot, Clinch Knot and the Knotless Knot. The different fishing knots all have their own unique uses and it is wise to learn as many fishing line knots as possible to make sure that you have the right fishing knot for the right situation.

The Tie-Fast Knot Tool is a handy little tool that ties several different types of fishing knots. These fishing knots are quick to tie and they are very strong.

How to tie Fishing Knots – Snell Knot

In this fishing knots video you get some good tips on snelling and flipping plus you get to learn how-to tie a Snell Knot

Great Fishing Knot resource CLICK HERE

See more knots: source

Water, Dehydration and You

Not drinking enough water can have some very serious effects on your body, especially in a survival situation. This infographic is about the importance of water for human body The dehydration and the implications for the body of the people. 

Water

by sebamelchor.
Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.

41 Genius Camping Hacks You Must Try

 

 

1. Make pizza in your pie iron with biscuit dough.

Get the complete recipe here. You can also just use sliced bread and a little butter.

 

2. Line your pie iron with foil for easy clean up.

Line your pie iron with foil for easy clean up.

You can go from grilled cheese to apple pie pocket with practically no clean up.

 

3. Wrapping your meat in cabbage leaves will keep it from getting burnt to a crisp.

Wrapping your meat in cabbage leaves will keep it from getting burnt to a crisp.

The cabbage is dense and moist enough to create the perfect nonstick barrier. No more accidental charred-to-a-crisp meals!

 

4. A miniature Tic Tac box makes a great miniature tackle box.

A miniature Tic Tac box makes a great miniature tackle box.

 

5. Adding sage to your campfire or fire pit keeps mosquitoes and bugs away.

Adding sage to your campfire or fire pit keeps mosquitoes and bugs away.

 

6. Kids can make an adorable and easy keepsake bracelet out of duct tape.

Kids can make an adorable and easy keepsake bracelet out of duct tape.

They can stick things on, like tiny pebbles, flowers, or leaves, and create a souvenir from their nature walk. Just make sure the sticky side is on the outside.

 

7. Here’s an awesome s’mores hack your kids will love:

Here's an awesome s'mores hack your kids will love:

 

8. Stovetop popcorn (like Jiffy Pop) can be made over a campfire.

They’re so easy to transport, and kids will be amazed when the foil begins to expand. Just be careful, as the handle will become very hot.

You can also make your own out of popcorn kernels and aluminum foil. Directions here.

 

9. Keep extra duct tape for emergencies right on your water bottle.

Keep extra duct tape for emergencies right on your water bottle.

 

10. Make eggs and bacon in a paper bag.

It’s an easy way to make multiple breakfasts at once. Get the recipe/directions here.

 

11. Use an acorn cap to loudly whistle for help if you’re lost in the woods.

Use an acorn cap to loudly whistle for help if you're lost in the woods.

Get the step-by-step instructions here.

 

Or make a willow whistle.

Or make a willow whistle.

Get the instructions here.

 

12. These compact towels can dry off two people after swimming and are dry to the touch within an hour of use.

These compact towels can dry off two people after swimming and are dry to the touch within an hour of use.

Purchase here.

 

13. Bailey’s dipped toasted marshmallows are a must for camping.

Bailey's dipped toasted marshmallows are a must for camping.

Toast a marshmallow over hot coals, and then dip the warm marshmallow into a cup of Bailey’s. They’re so delicious and addictive, you’ll want to make them even when you’re NOT camping.

 

14. Make flaming Jell-O marshmallow shots.

Make flaming Jell-O marshmallow shots.

HOW COOL IS THIS. Fill the marshmallows with a Jell-o mixture and dip into rum. Get the full recipe/directions here.

 

15. Make a last-minute camping spoon with a knife and a plastic bottle.

Make a last-minute camping spoon with a knife and a plastic bottle.

 

16. Fill a gallon milk jug with water and 1/4 cup salt to use as a salt block for your cooler.

The jugs mean that you won’t get water all over your food when the ice melts. The salt will make the cold last longer — however, it also means that the water in the jugs won’t double as emergency drinking water.

Read more about it here.

 

17. Carry your seasonings in straws.

Carry your seasonings in straws.

Just use a lighter to re-seal.

 

18. You can also keep seasonings, toppings, and condiments separate but organized in stackable pill containers.

You can also keep seasonings, toppings, and condiments separate but organized in stackable pill containers.

Label with a Sharpie.

 

19. Blue cheese filled bacon-wrapped mushrooms are the savory version of a campfire s’more.

Blue cheese filled bacon-wrapped mushrooms are the savory version of a campfire s'more.

Get the full directions here.

 

20. This is the coolest tarp trick:

This is the coolest tarp trick:

Use a small stick to help secure the main center line. When pressure is put on one end, the line will tighten evenly, keeping the grommets from being torn out.

 

21. Pre-make your food and vacuum seal it.

Pre-make your food and vacuum seal it.

It will stay fresh longer and will be easier to pack.

 

22. Keep your toiletries hooked onto a shower caddy.

Keep your toiletries hooked onto a shower caddy.

You can buy one here for $9.95 or make your own.

 

23. Slit foam swim noodles lengthwise and slip over each awning strut.

Slit foam swim noodles lengthwise and slip over each awning strut.

Not only are you less likely to bump into them in the dark, but they’ll be padded!

You can also use a pool noodle to cushion a canoe before strapping it to your car to protect from scratching.

 

24. Carry some emergency TP in an Altoids container.

Carry some emergency TP in an Altoids container.

Especially if you’re going to be venturing off on a hike or nature walk.

 

25. A 16-ounce water bottle will hold 8–9 large eggs.

A 16-ounce water bottle will hold 8–9 large eggs.

Pre-scrambling your eggs will save you the trouble of having to figure out a way of transporting them. It also eliminates the need for a separate bowl and whisk.

 

26. This collapsible silicone coffee dripper takes up almost no space.

This collapsible silicone coffee dripper takes up almost no space.

And it has a super high Amazon.com rating. Get it here for $10.99.

 

27. For fewer burrs, rub the laces of your hiking boots with paraffin before hitting the trail.

28. Corn chips (like Fritos or Doritos) make a great substitute kindling when starting a fire.

Corn chips (like Fritos or Doritos) make a great substitute kindling when starting a fire.

 

29. Make an inexpensive candle lantern out of a used tuna can and a candle.

Make an inexpensive candle lantern out of a used tuna can and a candle.

The foil will reflect the light and create more glow. It could potentially block some wind, as well.

 

30. Silicone cups are unbreakable and super easy to pack.

Silicone cups are unbreakable and super easy to pack.

Get ‘em here.

 

31. Make toothpaste dots.

Make toothpaste dots.

Spread them out on a plate, let them dry for 2–3 days, and then sprinkle baking soda over them. Once they dry, just pop them into a resealable plastic bag.

 

32. Keep your TP dry in a CD spindle.

If you’re trying to save space because you’re backpacking, take the tube out and flatten the toilet paper. Keep it in a plastic bag instead.

 

33. Instant grits will keep ants away from your campsite.

Instant grits will keep ants away from your campsite.

Just sprinkle wherever you see the ants.

 

34. Use biodegradable trail marking tape so you don’t get lost while hiking.

Use biodegradable trail marking tape so you don't get lost while hiking.

Buy it here.

 

35. Safely remove a tick with a cotton ball soaked in liquid hand soap.

Keep it on the tick for at least 20 seconds. The tick will cease biting, back out, and will remain stuck to the cotton ball when it’s pulled away. If the tick has been embedded for awhile, keep it in a jar so you can test it for Lyme disease.

Note that there is debate on whether this actually works. Here’s a testimonial that says it does, but there’s no scientific evidence to back it up, so try at your own risk and keep a pair of tweezers in your first aid kit.

 

36. Your deodorant doubles as a mosquito bite itch queller.

Your deodorant doubles as a mosquito bite itch queller.

 

37. Make solar camp lanterns out of mason jars and solar disks.

Make solar camp lanterns out of mason jars and solar disks.

Get the full directions here.

 

38. Johnson’s Baby Creamy Oil doubles as a super effective mosquito repellent.

Johnson's Baby Creamy Oil doubles as a super effective mosquito repellent.

And you won’t smell like bug repellent.

 

39. Glue sandpaper to the top of your match holder.

Glue sandpaper to the top of your match holder.

Keeping your matches in a tupperware or stainless container will ensure they don’t get wet.

 

40. Cobble together a makeshift shower using a large water jug and a watering can head.

Cobble together a makeshift shower using a large water jug and a watering can head.

Get the full directions here.

 

41. Make camping sangria concentrate using a mason jar.

Make camping sangria concentrate using a mason jar.

No, you don’t have to go camping to try this delicious sangria. Get the full recipe here.

Click here for more ingenious camping spots!

[source]

How to Survive in Space After the Ultimate Disaster

How to Survive in Space
Source: Emergency-Management-Degree.org

How to Survive in Space After the Ultimate Disaster

Prepper’s guide to surviving in space

Could humanity actually survive the ultimate emergency: the end of the world? From black holes to starvation, these are the essentials when it comes to surviving in space after a disaster destroys our Mother Earth.

Radiation

Simply leaving Earth’s atmosphere exposes you to more radiation than is healthy.

Earth’s atmosphere protects from radiation the way a 1 meter thick slab of metal would.

Problem:
1 Sievert = +5.5% rise in risk of fatal cancers
One round trip to Mars = .66 Sieverts
The equivalent of a full body CT scan every 5-6 days.

Solution:
Prolonged habitation on planets with weak atmospheres would require living underground.
Or,
A magnetosphere (for spaceships):
Magnetic fields like what earth is encased in can deflect radiation.
Shields need to be made of fibers.
Bulky materials are weak with spaces and imperfections.
A spider’s web is strong because it is made of individual unbroken threads.
Radiation sensors can alert space travelers when they need to be behind shields.

Starvation

It costs $10,000 per lb of food sent to the International Space Station–we’re going to need to grow food as we fly.
Astronauts currently get 3.8 pounds of food per day.
This is 7,000 lbs of food per person to get to mars and back.

Introducing Space Farming!
FOR SPACECRAFT GROWTH, consider:
Plant size
Antioxidants (fights radiation)
Quick growth time
No processing equipment required

Good candidates:
Lettuce
Spinach
Carrots
Tomatoes
Spring onions
Cabbage
Radishes

This keeps you fed, but growing food also:
Reduces stress
Improves mood
Alleviates depression
Promotes social growth
Pushes mental and physical rehabilitation
And increases resistance to general illness.

FOR GROWTH ON FOREIGN PLANETS, consider terraforming:
Ideally leading to an ecosystem, with oxygen produced
Carbon dioxide reduced,
And water recycled.

Space Dust

Wait…Moondust can be deadly?
It is the consistency of flour… so it:
Slips through gaps in equipment,
Is easily kicked up,
Sticks to people

Causing:
Radioactive exposure,
Allergic reactions,
Lung cancer from inhalation.

And Mars dust might be worse.

Space Junk

Debris that orbits the earth travels at 17,500 mph.
Orbiting for millions of years.

Even a small fleck of paint
Can disable a middle-sized spacecraft.
–> Any collision then makes more spaces of space junk.

Static Electricity

Yes…static electricity can disable equipment in space.

In humid conditions, water conducts electrons off of our body.
Space is incredibly dry.

Every time equipment touches other objects in space
chance for equipment crippling static electricity occurs.

NASA has a reverse lightning rod.

Black Holes

Once you’re past the event horizon, that black hole isn’t letting you go.
Event horizon: the point around a black hole where gravity is so strong that light and radiation can’t escape.
–Meaning– We can’t see past the event horizon.

Small black holes(the size of earth) are extreme.
To get pulled past the event horizon
Would instantly turn you into a stream of subatomic particles.

Larger black holes give you more time (literally)

As you accelerate faster and faster you move through time more slowly.
Things falling into the hole in front of you slow in time more.
So in front of you, you can see things previously fallen into the hole
And behind you, you can see things from the future, rapidly approaching you.

Meanwhile you’ll “spaghetifi” because the gravity on your head (or whichever end is falling into the hole first)
will be so much more than that on your feet.

Water

Turns out there is water in space. [11]

Interplanetary dust contains both hydrogen and oxygen, at times mixing to rain down on surfaces.

Interplanetary dust is also the most carbon-rich meteoric substance.
With 30,000 – 40,000 tons of interplanetary dust raining onto Earth yearly
It could have been the origin of life on Earth.
–> And it could sustain us in space in the future.

So surviving in space isn’t a cinch. There’s a reason it’s called the final frontier.

 

Citations:

  1. http://www.space.com/21353-space-radiation-mars-mission-threat.html
  2. http://www.nasa.gov/vision/space/travelinginspace/radiation_shielding.html
  3. http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/27/world/europe/star-trek-shield/
  4. http://modernfarmer.com/2013/09/starship-salad-bar/
  5. http://news.discovery.com/space/history-of-space/kitchen-mars-astronauts-110829.htm
  6. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130328075708.htm
  7. http://www.cracked.com/article_19158_the-6-weirdest-dangers-space-travel.html
  8. http://www.wired.com/science/space/news/2005/04/67110
  9. http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/01581/SpaceTravelEnglish/dangers/spacedebris.html
  10. http://www.livescience.com/19683-happen-fall-black-hole.html
  11. http://www.space.com/24422-solar-wind-makes-water-star-dust.html
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