Water Survival Tips

Water Survival Tips

What To Know When Storing Water

This is a handy infographic on what you should know when storing water. Print, save or share this for future use. Knowledge is the first step in prepping for survival.

how to store water

Benefits of Rainwater Collection

To say that water is a precious natural resource in this world is an understatement. There have been many stories told about how people have survived on water alone in the most dire circumstances. Water sustains life, not just human life but all life on earth. However, there is a growing worldwide concern on the limited supply of water that we use.

People living in Australia, considered as one of the ‘driest continents in the world’,  have learned to harvest rainwater to supply their household needs using it for just about everything from drinking, to cooking, to bathing, doing laundry, irrigating the fields and whatever else that might normally be done with water.

Benefits of Rainwater Collection

Rainwater harvesting is the accumulation, collection and distribution of rainwater for use in the household and, in some cases, in the work place. If done properly rainwater makes for a safe and sustainable supply of water, not to mention it being very economical as it can effectively eliminate paying monthly water bills. It also makes you self-reliant when it comes to water supply because people who harvest rainwater are not dependent on the water companies especially during the times when it has to be rationed due to lack of supply common during the summer. Having your own rainwater harvesting system would ensure you a steady supply of water all year round.

Not only is rainwater free, but with its natural quality most also believe it is safer than those supplied by some water companies which often collect water from dams which is chemically treated to make it potable. With rainwater being chemical-free, it makes for a healthier option.

Aside from its economic benefits, investing in rainwater harvesting can also be socially and environmentally beneficial. As noted earlier, having your own rainwater harvesting system makes you self-reliant by allowing you to supply your own water needs, meaning you would become one less person who will be dependent on the government and water companies for water supply. There would then be no need to build more dams and to install more pipes, the cost of which will eventually find its way to your taxes. Rainwater harvesting also lessens the accumulation of water in creeks and other water habitats especially during a storm, which is one of the many factors that contribute to damaging these natural water habitats.

Essential to rainwater harvesting then is the installation of a good system wherein the rainwater is accumulated on the roof and channeled towards a tank for storage. There are many tanks to choose from but a good one should be able to save you money, easy to install, effectively store water without making your home look incongruous and cost less in maintenance.

Water More Valuable Than Gold?

What Does a 20% Water Reduction Look Like?

At some point in the future, maybe the near future, fresh water will become a scarce commodity. In fact, many predict that it will surpass oil, gas and even gold as the most sought after commodity in the world. There are many things you can do to reduce waste or conserve what you have collected.

The infographic below outlines how much can be saved right now:

What does a 20% water reduction look like?

How To Build Your Own Heavy Duty 275 Gallon RAIN BARREL

Picture of Heavy Duty 275 Gallon RAIN BARREL
My wife asked for a rain barrel for her flowers. Our water bill has added up again and again, so I started checking craigslist for possiblities. As luck would have it, I found a polytank that was original used for similac baby food storage. That was great, since I didn’t want to worry about chemicals in the tank killing the plants and garden. The seller offered to deliver for the $35 purchase price. Great deal!!

Step 1:

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The first thing I did was to go to the hardware store and get connections so I could hook up my downspouts. I found black plastic tubing that was cheap and useful.

Step 2:

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The shower drain is on the left along with the coupling to attach it to the black gutter pipe I got at the store. As you can see the pipe in the background has a square opening, meant to receive the end of a normal downspout from the house.

Step 3:

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I couldn’t find a really good connection for the plastic. Most plumbing is meant to be screwed down and wouldn’t work. So, I used 3″ shower pan drain. It was a oversize screw type and I drilled a 3 1/8 hole, slipped the connection in and screwed on the retaining cap. Then I connected the downspout. The sizes were not the same, so I used a rubber connection meant for odd sized pipes. I used metal straps to hold both connections. And as a bonus, the shower drain cover acts as a large item filter for the tank.

Step 4:

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I realized I needed a overflow for the water, just in case I filled the tank. (Which has happened twice in the last month!) So I added a second connection that simply goes to the other side and drains into the low ridge between my house and the neighbors, which leads to a sewer drain. So the final product is not the prettiest thing in the world, but it works great and helps to save me a little cash. All parts including the cinder blocks to support the tank were under $100. The tank is up a little to provide some water pressure for the hose. And actually, I may add two more blocks or a water pump soon, because the water pressure is still a little low.



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