12 Best Vehicles For Surviving The Zombie Apocalypse 

12 Best Vehicles For Surviving The Zombie Apocalypse

Since the episode last night of Doomsday Preppers had a guy modifying an old school bus to be his battle wagon after the destruction caused by of an F5 tornado, I thought I would share this article showing other options you might consider. While I will admit, part of me wants to build my own gassifier engine and go to town on an old bus with a cutting torch, these options below come with considerably less work, risk of fire and could run much better than that old yellow tank. If nothing else, you won’t need to make your own employees work on this for you. For the rest of us that don’t have our own companies that might be a non-starter.

If you are going to purchase a vehicle that you can use to bug out, one of these beauties below might be the ticket. The good folks at the HiConsumption site pulled this great list together.

With The Walking Dead season premiere set to kick off in just over a week, we once again got to thinking about the zombie apocalypse. We got you covered last year with a list of zombie proof gear to help fend off the undead, but the reality is you aren’t going to be able to take on those flesh eating zombies on foot. You need wheels, and your current vehicle just isn’t going to cut it. Now imagine for a second that you had perfect circumstances – imagine you can get your hands on nearly anything you could think of (within reason of course). That’s the approach we took when creating this list of the best vehicles for the zombie apocalypse. You need something reliable, capable, and let’s be honest, you need something badass. You’ve been prepping for this zombie outbreak for years now, and you want to let everyone know that you are the baddest S.O.B. on the planet. Check out some of our favorite options for the end of the world in the 12 best vehicles for surviving the zombie apocalypse below.

Chevrolet Silverado Black Ops

1. Chevrolet Silverado Black Ops

Let’s start things off with a practical choice. Chevy makes a solid truck, there’s no doubt about it, and this one was built specifically for unforeseen emergencies. Although we can’t say that the zombie outbreak was “unforeseen,” we can certainly classify it as an emergency. The fully capable 4×4 features a 5.3 liter EcoTec3 V8 engine with plenty of power (355 ponies to be exact) along with lower body armor, raised suspension, solar power pack, generator, military First Aid Kit, gas masks, a crate of food with Top Ramen and Twinkies (your new favorite food groups in this post apocalyptic world), and a whole lot more. [Details]

Motoped Motorized Bicycle

2. Motoped Motorized Bicycle

You’re going to need something that is nimble and quick. Sure the big bulky trucks have their place, but a solid 2 wheeled companion is an essential. Motoped created a simple conversion kit that lets you outfit your mountain bike with Honda 50-190cc motor for about $1,000. [Details]

Hyundai Zombie Survival Car

3. Hyundai Zombie Survival Car

If Hyundai is good enough for Rick and his crew on The Walking Dead, we’d suffice to say that it’s good enough for us. Thankfully the folks at Hyundai take their zombie response research very seriously, and have outfitted one of their Elantra coupes with a ton of security features from a zombie plow with massive spikes to armored windows and spiked all terrain tires for going where no other vehicle can go. [Details]

Knight XV Fully Armored SUV

4. Knight XV Fully Armored SUV

Who says you can’t stay drenched in luxury in this new post-apocalyptic world? The Knight XV is luxury and ruggedness, fused into one completely bad-ass SUV. The vehicle is packed with a 6.8 liter V10 engine, seating for 6, night vision cameras and bulletproof armor. [Details]

Gibbs Quadski Amphibious 4 Wheel Drive Quad

5. Gibbs Quadski Amphibious 4 Wheel Drive Quad

It’s been debated for years whether or not zombies will be able to swim. From our extensive research (hundreds of hours watching zombie movies and shows), we’re going to go with no, they can’t swim. The 4WD Gibbs Quadski is perfect for tackling tough terrain, and within 5 seconds, the vehicle can tuck its tires to hit the water. Thanks to the 175 horsepower engine, you can hit speeds of up 45 miles per hour on land, which is plenty fast to leave those undead bastards in the rear view. [Details]

Mercedes-Benz G63 AMG 6x6

6. Mercedes-Benz G63 AMG 6×6

Not only will MB’s 6 wheeled off road monster provide you with a fully capable means of transportation, but it will also bring about some nice entertainment. For such a massive vehicle (8,400 pound curb weight), the 5.5 liter AMG V8 powered 6×6 is actually quite agile. Although it’s based on the military version, this thing handles more like a truck than a tank. [Details]

Sportsmobile Ultimate Adventure Vehicle

7. Sportsmobile Ultimate Adventure Vehicle

The folks at Sportsmobile design rugged Mercedes-Benz and Ford E-350 vans that are capable of tackling any off road terrain, while also providing a mobile home living experience. The cargo van has been equipped with everything one needs to survive in the wild, with plenty of room for bikes and water vessels. [Details]

KTM 990 Adventure Baja Edition

8. KTM 990 Adventure Baja Edition

Again, enclosed cars and trucks are great, but 2 wheelers serve a vital role in your survival. There are few motorcycles that perform quite like this bad boy from KTM. Crowned the most off road capable travel enduro in the world, the 990 Adventure Baja has been outfitted with everything you need from suspension to power plant to ensure that you can transition from the asphalt to the dirt roads. There’s a slim chance anyone will be keeping up with road maintenance after the virus spreads, and this V-Twin powered machine will be able to tackle any beaten road you can throw at it. [Details]

WaterCar Panther Amphibious Jeep

9. WaterCar Panther Amphibious Jeep

It goes without saying that a Jeep Wrangler will always be a solid choice when it comes to the inevitable apocalypse. You can’t go wrong when it comes to Jeep, but a Jeep that can quickly convert to a boat? Now that’s a real winner. Assuming that zombies can’t swim, this thing is great for escaping those sticky situations. Packed with a 3.7 liter V6 motor built by the Japanese auto makers at Honda, this Jeep is capable of speeds exceeding 40 miles per hour on water, and 80 mph on land. The best part is the transition from land vehicle to boat takes only 15 seconds. [Details]

Pal V One Personal Air and Land Vehicle

10. Pal V One Personal Air and Land Vehicle

Technically the results are still inconclusive when it comes to zombie’s ability to swim (although we think not), but there is one thing we’d put money on – zombies will not be able to fly. With that being said taking to the air can be risky business during this zombie infested time era (imagine crashing into a horde of zombies), but bear with us on this vehicle. The Pal V One acts like a sports car on the ground, accelerating from zero to sixty miles per hour in just 8 seconds, while reaching a top speed of 112 mph. In just minutes, the vehicle can be transformed into a Gyro-Copter, flying at altitudes of about 4,000 feet (well below commercial flight routes, although we can’t imagine there will be many commercial flights during the zombie apocalypse). The vehicle’s fuel tank can store enough fuel for over 300 miles of flight time. Now this vehicle is currently still in the “development” process, but the concept, if executed well, could make a nice addition to your stable of vehicles rather than your sole choice of transportation. [Details]

Mercedes-Benz Unimog

11. Mercedes-Benz Unimog

The folks at Benz said it best when they said the monster of a vehicle known as the Unimog offers “absolute off-road supremacy.” You can take Mercedes’ word for it, or you can research the 10 different models that were designed for disaster emergencies in the harshest conditions. This could be a bit impractical as your only means of transportation, but it could be a huge asset in your stash of vehicles. [Details]

Paramount Group Marauder

12. Paramount Group Marauder

Hands down the baddest vehicle on the planet, the Marauder will withstand any test you throw at it. The armored vehicle destroys everything in its path. Features include long range fuel tanks, the ability to survive TNT explosions, ultra modern climate control system, run flat tire that can be pierced by 12.7mm bullets, anti blast seats, and so much more. The vehicle has a fording depth of half the vehicle, meaning it can swim too. Reaching speeds of 120 kilometers per hour, this thing is far from a slouch. If you can get your hands on one of these, do it. [Details]

Source: 12 Best Vehicles For Surviving The Zombie Apocalypse – Trendwerks

Does It Really Take $50,000 To Be A Prepper?

 

What Does it Cost to Prepare

Scouring the internet for information on disaster preparedness sheds an interesting light on what most people think it costs to ready themselves for the unexpected. Guides abound on how to prepare with minimal investments – but most put the focus on unreliable foodstuffs, tools, and supplies.

At the opposite end of the spectrum are the complete “how to” guides, that claim to show a family how to prepare for any emergency. These guides tend to indicate that the total cost of preparing a family of four for a natural disaster ranges from $5,000 to over $50,000.

Preparing for the Worst – Not As Expensive As Most Think

Does It Really Take $50,000 To Be A Survival Prepper?

Preparing for a disaster doesn’t mean that you and your family could survive in an underground bunker for thirty years without ever accessing the outside world. It means preparing for the inevitable and unexpected emergencies that can arise at any time.

Disaster preparedness isn’t limited to hurricanes, blizzards, and failures of the national infrastructure. It extends into the smaller disasters that we encounter while going about our everyday lives – like getting stranded in a broken down vehicle in the middle of nowhere, or finding yourself injured while on a hike.

Preparing for these situations is relatively inexpensive. With the help of products like the Bucket Survival Kits it can be incredibly simple, too.




Preparing for Different Types of Emergencies

While the ideal disaster preparedness plan includes provisions for long periods of isolation from modern amenities (such as running water and food supplies), the majority of emergencies the average person will encounter require far less extensive planning.

Breakdown / Stranded Emergencies – If your vehicle were to break down, or if you found yourself stranded in the middle of nowhere, what would you do? With a ready-made kit, like the Guardian Elite (which comes prepared in a sturdy, easy-to-carry back pack) you would have food, and first aid supplies on hand. Toss in a few bottles of water before you head out, and you’ll have that covered, too.

Temporarily Unavailable Food Supplies – Whether it’s a true natural disaster or merely a predicted blizzard, when the newsman warns that rough weather is moving in, everyone rushes to the grocery store and clears the shelves. Having a one month supply of food on hand would ensure that your family doesn’t go hungry, and with kits like the 240 Serving Meal Package, is not only affordable, but incredibly easy to store.

In both of the cases described above, your total investment is going to be far less than what you might expect. Since the kits are ready made and based on government recommendations for preparedness, you can also be sure that they’re relatively complete.

Don’t put off preparing for disaster because you don’t think you can afford it – it’s far less expensive than you think.

Please share your cost saving prepper and survival ideas in the comments below.


Water Bricks For Survival

Whether you are planning on bugging in, bugging out or have some other survival shelter hidden away, you will need a good stockpile of water. Adding WaterBrick storage in a pantry, a garage or a bunker is a great idea for emergency water storage. And if needed they are more portable than 55 gallon water barrels.

Here are a few examples:

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick – 8 Pack Tan

Emergency Water Storage System - Stackable Boxes, BPA-Free Bladder, Portable - Disaster Prepper Home Water Supply - With Aquamira Drinking Water Purification & Fill Hose (60 Gallon)

Emergency Water Storage System – Stackable Boxes, BPA-Free Bladder, Portable – Disaster Prepper Home Water Supply – With Aquamira Drinking Water Purification & Fill Hose

 

Water Storage Containers - WaterBrick - 32 Pack Blue

Water Storage Containers – WaterBrick Wall – 32 Pack Blue

 

These examples of water storage are practical and easy to use.

  • Stackable rectangular blocks which interlock for stability.
  • Easy to grip handle.
  • Can be used for water or foods like rice, beans, or anything you want to keep safe and dry from the elements.
  • FDA approved, and BPA free.

100 Items That Will Disappear First In The U. S. When The SHTF

We saw it with Sandy, and now you are seeing it with the severe winter storms this year, the un-prepared hoards of people buying anything and everything off of the store shelves.

Natural disasters happen. It’s Mother Nature. Do you think you could last a few days, weeks, or even months without the basics of food, water, gas and electricity? What is your plan? Do you have food insurance built up? Water? Fuel? Etc…

100 Items That Will Disappear First In The US When Disaster Strikes.

You can start small and build up your supplies over time. You may even have many of theses items already.

Below is a list of the 100 items most likely to disappear in a disaster scenario:

1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy…target of thieves; maintenance etc.)
2. Water Filters/Purifiers
3. Portable Toilets
4. Seasoned Firewood. Wood takes about 6 – 12 months to become dried, for home uses.
5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps (First Choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile ANY!)
6. Coleman Fuel. Impossible to stockpile too much.
7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.
8. Hand-can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.
9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar
10. Rice – Beans – Wheat
11. Vegetable Oil (for cooking) Without it food burns/must be boiled etc.,)
12. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid (Will become scarce suddenly)
13. Water Containers (Urgent Item to obtain.) Any size. Small: HARD CLEAR PLASTIC ONLY – note – food grade if for drinking.
14. Mini Heater head (Propane) (Without this item, propane won’t heat a room.)
15. Grain Grinder (Non-electric)
16. Propane Cylinders (Urgent: Definite shortages will occur.
17. Survival Guide Book.
18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting is difficult.)
19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula. ointments/aspirin, etc.
20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)
21. Cookstoves (Propane, Coleman & Kerosene)
22. Vitamins
23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder (Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous without this item)
24. Feminine Hygiene/Hair-care/Skin products.
25. Thermal underwear (Tops & Bottoms)
26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, Wedges (also, honing oil)
27. Aluminum Foil Reg. & Heavy Duty (Great Cooking and Barter Item)
28. Gasoline Containers (Plastic & Metal)
29. Garbage Bags (Impossible To Have Too Many).
30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels
31. Milk – Powdered & Condensed (Shake Liquid every 3 to 4 months)
32. Garden Seeds (Non-Hybrid) (A MUST)
33. Clothes pins/line/hangers (A MUST)
34. Coleman’s Pump Repair Kit
35. Tuna Fish (in oil)
36. Fire Extinguishers (or..large box of Baking Soda in every room)
37. First aid kits
38. Batteries (all sizes…buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)
39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
40. Big Dogs (and plenty of dog food)
41. Flour, yeast & salt
42. Matches. {“Strike Anywhere” preferred.) Boxed, wooden matches will go first
43. Writing paper/pads/pencils, solar calculators
44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in Wintertime.)
45. Work-boots, belts, Levis & durable shirts
46. Flashlights/LIGHTSTICKS & torches, “No. 76 Dietz” Lanterns
47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks (jot down ideas, feelings, experience; Historic Times)
48. Garbage cans Plastic (great for storage, water, transporting – if with wheels)
49. Men’s Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail clippers, etc
50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)
51. Fishing supplies/tools
52. Mosquito coils/repellent, sprays/creams
53. Duct Tape
54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
55. Candles
56. Laundry Detergent (liquid)
57. Backpacks, Duffel Bags
58. Garden tools & supplies
59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.
61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)
62. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)
63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
64. Bicycles…Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc
65. Sleeping Bags & blankets/pillows/mats
66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
67. Board Games, Cards, Dice
68. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)
71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap (saves a lot of water)
72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
73. Shaving supplies (razors & creams, talc, after shave)
74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
75. Soy sauce, vinegar, bullions/gravy/soup-base
76. Reading glasses
77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
78. “Survival-in-a-Can
79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
80. Boy Scout Handbook, / also Leaders Catalog
81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)
82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)
85. Lumber (all types)
86. Wagons & carts (for transport to and from)
87. Cots & Inflatable mattress’s
88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.
89. Lantern Hangers
90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws,, nuts & bolts
91. Teas
92. Coffee
93. Cigarettes
94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc,)
95. Paraffin wax
96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.
97. Chewing gum/Candy/Chocolate
98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)
99. Hats & Bandanas, cotton neckerchiefs
100. Goats/Chickens/Rabbits

Some Thoughts From a Sarajevo War Survivor:

Experiencing horrible things that can happen in a war – death of parents and
friends, hunger and malnutrition, endless freezing cold, fear, sniper attacks.

1. Stockpiling helps. But you never no how long trouble will last, so locate
near renewable food sources.
2. Living near a water well with a manual pump is like being in Eden.
3. After awhile, even gold can lose its luster. But there is no luxury in war
quite like toilet paper. Its surplus value is greater than gold‘s.
4. If you had to go without one utility, lose electricity – it’s the easiest to
do without (unless you’re in a very nice climate with no need for heat.)
5. Canned foods are awesome, especially if their contents are tasty without
heating. One of the best things to stockpile is canned gravy – it makes a lot of
the dry unappetizing things you find to eat in war somewhat edible. Only needs
enough heat to “warm”, not to cook. It’s cheap too, especially if you buy it in
bulk.
6. Bring some books – escapist ones like romance or mysteries become more
valuable as the war continues. Sure, it’s great to have a lot of survival
guides, but you’ll figure most of that out on your own anyway – trust me, you’ll
have a lot of time on your hands.
7. The feeling that you’re human can fade pretty fast. I can’t tell you how many
people I knew who would have traded a much needed meal for just a little bit of
toothpaste, rouge, soap or cologne. Not much point in fighting if you have to
lose your humanity. These things are morale-builders like nothing else.
8. Slow burning candles and matches, matches, matches

How To Survive A Night In Your Car

Photo by Alex E. Proimos

It’s a harrowing statistic, but according to the National Weather Service, about 70 percent of winter weather-related fatalities occur in an automobile. You can bet many of those vehicle-related deaths began with someone simply leaving the house to run an errand, make a short trip to visit family or friends or take care of routine business. The weather turns unexpectedly bad, road conditions rapidly deteriorate and, suddenly, what was an ordinary drive becomes an overnight ordeal.

Don’t think just because you don’t live in New England, the upper Midwest or the western mountains that something like this can’t happen to you. Even in areas where snow is a rare event, cars can slide off icy roads and become stranded in freezing weather, leaving passengers stuck right there with them. Here’s how to make it through a freezing night in your car and ride out events until help can arrive.

Be Prepared

The first thing to do as winter approaches is be sure you have stored a few key items in your car. If you wait until you need them to try to round them up, it will be too late. Essential items to include in a winter survival kit, according to a combination of recommendations by Wisconsin Emergency Management’s Ready Wisconsin initiative and survival expert Peter Kummerfeldt’s OutdoorSafe website, include:

  • Bottled water (at least four quarts)
  • Snack foods, particularly nutritious energy bars
  • Raisins, dried fruit, nuts, candy bars
  • Strike-anywhere, waterproof matches and small candles
  • A flashlight with extra batteries
  • First-aid kit
  • Folding knife and multi-tool
  • Emergency flares
  • An extra winter coat, mittens and a wool cap
  • Winter boots
  • Toilet paper
  • Cellphone and charger
  • A space blanket
  • A spare blanket or sleeping bag
  • A portable radio with spare batteries
  • Tow rope
  • Nylon cord
  • Flagging tape
  • Chemical hand and body warmer packets

Other essential winter tools in severe weather country include jumper cables, a small shovel, tire chains and rock salt, sand or kitty litter to provide added traction when stuck on a slick surface.

Before You Go

If you’re leaving for an extended trip, always check weather and road conditions before departing. If poor conditions are forecast, you may consider postponing your trip. Also, let others know when you are leaving, which way you will be traveling and when you should arrive at your destination so they can alert authorities and provide them with solid information to help in finding you should the need arise. Fill your car with fuel and make frequent stops to stretch, relax and refill your tank, never allowing it to get much below a half tank. Should you become stuck and need to spend the night in your car, the ample gas will allow you to start your car throughout the night and run the heat for short intervals.

If You Are Stranded

First call for help if you can’t get your car unstuck. Don’t overexert yourself and don’t leave your car and begin walking for help. You stand a much better chance of being found if you remain with your car, which can also provide the best shelter from the elements. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety warns against running your car constantly. Instead, be sure the exhaust pipe is free from snow and roll down a window enough to vent the car and prevent carbon monoxide buildup. Run the car for short 15-20 minute intervals to warm up and then turn it back off, using blankets, a sleeping bag, hand warmers and the body heat of others in your car to stay warm. Eat snacks to keep nourished and read a book (another item Kummerfeldt recommends) until help arrives.

[source]

Is Your Office Survival Ready?

Office Safety

Picture this: A building inspection officer shows up at your office and wants to know about your emergency plans—evacuation, fire extinguishers, smoke alarms, and the like. What do you tell him? Would everyone in the office be able to explain where those things were and how to use them?

Well, if you don’t know the answers to those questions, perhaps it’s time to find out.

As with other types of emergency preparedness, preparedness at the office constitutes having an emergency evacuation/lockdown plan and being prepared with emergency supplies. Office personnel should be educated on how to implement these plans and know where to find the emergency supplies and how to use them, if possible.

Evacuation plan

Know where the exit is to your office building? Good—that’s a start, but “mass stampede to the door” does not constitute a very thorough evacuation plan. Even if you are a very small company in a tiny office, it’s a good idea to think through procedures for what you would do in case of emergency. After the attacks on 9/11, an estimated 13,000 to 15,000 people successfully evacuated the World Trade Centers, and it is thought that this can be attributed to improved evacuation plans after the 1993 fire. Don’t wait for the aftermath of an emergency to get prepared—while your evacuation plan may not be to such a large scale, you should know at the very least who should go to what exit in order t get everyone out quickly and safely and how to shut off gas, water, and electricity.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provides a step-by-step guide (www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3088.pdf) on how to develop an emergency action plan for your workplace. According to the OSHA, not every business is required to have a plan, but emergencies can strike regardless of whether you’re required to have a plan or not, so every business would do well to have a plan to protect its personnel.

Emergency supplies

Basic office emergency supplies include a first-aid kit, a fire extinguisher, and a defibrillator, along with other supplies specific to your workplace (such as an eyewash station if you work with harmful chemicals, for instance). It’s also a good idea to be prepared for long-term emergency situations where employees may be trapped in the workspace for an extended period of time—Year Zero Survival Gear provides a full range of emergency kits that include food, lighting, hygiene supplies and more to sustain groups of people in these kinds of situations.

Unfortunately, emergencies don’t wait until after 5:00 to strike. Employ good preparedness  principles and have peace of mind at home, at work, and at play.

6 Tips To Prepare For A Hurricane

Learn how planning ahead can help you protect your family, your home and your belongings in a dangerous storm.

Content provided by Allstate

NASA / NOAA GOES-13 satellite image showing Hurricane Irene on August 25, 2011. (Photo:NASA Goddard Photo and Video/Flickr)

When the weatherman tells you to take cover because a hurricane is on the way, the last thing you want to do is worry about whether you are prepared. A little effort now—before catastrophe strikes—can yield big savings (and peace of mind) in the future.
These 6 tips can help you plan ahead so you never have to face a storm unprepared.

1. Check your insurance coverage to make sure it reflects the current state of your home. Consider adding flood insurance and coverage for additional living expenses in case your home is uninhabitable after a storm.

2. Doing a home inventory can save you time and make filing a claim easier, ensuring you don’t forget anything. Document the contents of your home with a video camera or other home inventory tool. Keep receipts for valuable items and consider separate coverage for these things.

3. Protect your property by installing the following items in your home:

  • Hurricane shutters or keep ¾ inch outdoor plywood boards for each window. If using boards, be sure to install anchors and pre-drill holes so you can put them up quickly.
  • Head and foot bolts on doors for extra protection.
  • Hurricane straps or clips to help hold the roof to the walls of your home.
  • A safe room that can withstand high winds and flying debris.
Also, be sure to keep up with your landscaping; diseased and damaged tree limbs can become serious hazards in high-speed storm winds.

4. Stock your emergency supply kit with basic survival items. You’ll want to have a 2-week supply of water and ready-to-eat, non-perishable food for every family member and pet. If you evacuate, you’ll want a 3-day supply of the same. Other items to add to your supply kit include:

  • Manual can opener
  • Essential medicines including eyeglasses and contact lenses
  • Personal hygiene items such as toilet paper, toothbrush and toothpaste
  • Change of clothing
  • Paper towels, hand sanitizer, and eating utensils
  • First-aid kit
  • Battery-powered flashlight and radio with extra batteries
  • Blankets, pillows and sleeping bags
  • Mosquito repellant and citronella candles
  • 2 coolers—one for food, one for ice
  • Plastic tarp for roof/window repairs and tools
  • Special items for infant, elderly or disabled family members
5. Have an established evacuation plan to help reduce stress. If you don’t have transportation of your own, make arrangements now with friends or family members and don’t forget about the pets!
You want to make sure the whole family is covered, so identify an out-of-state contact that everyone will call if separated and establish a meeting location at least 50 miles inland.
Lastly, gather important papers to take with you:

  • Driver’s license or personal ID
  • Social security card
  • Proof of residence (deed, lease or utility bills)
  • Insurance policies (home, auto, flood, wind)
  • Birth and marriage certificates
  • Stocks, bond and other negotiable certificates
  • Wills, deeds, and copies of recent tax returns
  • Personal checkbook and any unpaid bills
6. Don’t take silly risks like running back into a home that’s been destroyed or refuse to evacuate when you’ve been ordered to, just to salvage material possessions. Things can be replaced, but people cannot.

Just Like The Squirrels, It’s Time To Prepare For Winter

Just like squirrels scurry around storing acorns and other winter food sources, we should too. Squirrels collect and store nuts so they’ll have food to last through winter, have you stored your food for the winter?

squirrel

And not only food, but other essential items too, like water, fuel, wood, first aid, paper goods, candles, solar panels, batteries, seeds for next year, etc…

Think in bulk, add items from your local supermarket, several types of flour, basmati rice, short grain rice, couscous, quinoa, black beans, kidney beans, lima beans, pinto beans, chopped tomatoes, yeast, salt, sugar, spices and herbs, dried peppers and onions, masa, cornmeal, powdered milk, vinegar, coffee, and more.

Here are some of our favorite bulk long-term food storage buckets:

120 Serving Milk Bucket FSK120

120 Serving Milk Bucket

120 Serving Wise Fruit Buckets

120 Serving Wise Fruit Buckets

Millennium Energy Bar (Cherry) - 400 Calories

Millennium Energy Bars

120 Serving Wise Vegetable Buckets

120 Serving Wise Vegetable Buckets

Ultimate Seven Day Emergency Meal Kit

Ultimate Seven Day Emergency Meal Kit

84 Serving - Entrée Only Grab n' Go Bucket

84 Serving – Entrée Only Grab n’ Go Bucket

60 Serving Meat Bucket

60 Serving Meat Bucket

WISE FAVORITES BOX KIT FSBX

FAVORITES BOX KIT

Real Eggs 24 Serving FSEG

Real Eggs 24 Serving

And don’t forget to add some fire-starter materials, in case of long term utilities outage.

Boxed Individual Pouches- Wise FIre FSWF

Boxed Individual Pouches- Wise FIre starters

Every fall we get the urge to store away provisions for the coming winter. Having supplies on hand is the way to survive when you live in inclimate weather zones. So do like the squirrels and add to your winter stash of food.

 

 

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