Hurricane Preparation Tips For Families And Homeowners

Huricane-Season

Image via Pixabay by WikiImages

A hurricane is a scary ordeal. There’s no two ways about it. If you live in an area where there’s a chance of experiencing one, however, there are things you need to know to ensure the safety of yourself and your family and to protect your home and possessions.

 

Know How To Survive

 

Hurricanes are incredibly dangerous, but there are things you can do to greatly increase your chances of survival. These include:

 

  • Keep plenty of water on hand for drinking and cleaning in case you’re left without running water when the storm is over.
  • Keep plenty of gas in your vehicle so you can get away if evacuation is necessary.
  • Keep cash on hand in case of power outages.
  • Keep up with the storm through the web, TV and/or radio as much as possible.
  • Close your doors and stay away from windows. Keep shades and curtains closed.
  • Stay on the lowest level of your home and get under a table if possible.
  • Secure items outside of your home as best as possible to avoid having them become dangerous when picked up by the wind.
  • Follow evacuation instructions from authorities.

 

Use A Storage Facility

 

If you live in an area where there is a chance of being impacted by a hurricane, it’s a good idea to rent a storage unit somewhere out of the danger zone for storing your most important items that you don’t need in your home at all times.

 

“The golden rule of disaster preparation is to pretend a storm is coming tomorrow,” says  ClosetBox. “Don’t wait to start preparing. Again, the first step is often to designate and prepare a space to hold your survival supplies. Consider, too, the beach-style bungalow is on the short list of many people’s dream homes. Yet, these floor designs rarely allow for excess storage. For this reason alone, convenient and cost-effective storage solutions are often crucial for those who live near the beach.”

 

Prepare Your Pool

 

If you have a swimming pool in your backyard, there are several things you should consider before a hurricane comes. In the Swim touches on these, calling draining the pool a “major no-no” because a strong enough storm could actually cause an empty pool to pop out of the ground. The water helps to hold in in place. It also recommends adding extra chlorine to combat potential pollutants that could contaminate the water during the storm and leaving the pool cover off because it could fly up/away and cause its own damage.

 

“Turn off the electric breaker system to your pool to avoid electrical surge damage,” it says. “This includes all the mechanical systems in your pool as well as any lighting. Filter damage is the most common pool damage that occurs during hurricanes, so it’s important to protect it. If the filter is going to be at risk for complete water submersion, remove the pump and secure it in a safe, dry location inside. Some also opt to merely cover the pump with watertight plastic and rope to prevent water damage.”

 

It’s hard to avoid experiencing some amount of damage when a hurricane rolls through, but if you prepare, you can minimize that damage and keep yourself and your family safe as Mother Nature otherwise wreaks havoc.

 

Bradley Davis is a retired firefighter and SoCal resident. He has seen is fair share of natural disasters and knows all too well the damage they can cause when people in their paths aren’t prepared. He created DisasterWeb.net to share his emergency preparedness knowledge and to offer the many emergency planning and natural disaster-related resources he has compiled from his online research. When he isn’t adding new information to his site, Bradley enjoys relaxing on the beach with his wife.

A Beginner’s Guide To Living Off-Grid

A Beginner’s Guide To Living Off-Grid

It used to be that the only time ‘living off-grid’ was used in everyday conversations was when someone was referencing an extremist individual or group. However, that is simply not the case anymore. As of 2013, more than 180,000 Americans were already living off the grid, and it is estimated that by 2035 that number will increase to a whopping 12 percent of the US population. If you are one of those people who dreams of an off-grid lifestyle, we at Modernize have a few pointers to help you get started.

 

A Beginner’s Guide To Living Off-Grid

Purchasing Land

If you are looking to buy land on which to build an off-grid home, there are several factors you will want to research before placing an offer on a piece of property, such as location and building regulations. Depending on your family’s age and health, determining an acceptable commute time between hospitals, school, and work will need to be thoughtfully considered in order to narrow down the radius of your search. Along the same lines, knowing exactly what the local laws are in regards to essential off-grid living components like septic tanks, wells, and wind turbines will save you many headaches when it comes time to begin construction. Most municipalities have their building codes listed on their website and are happy to answer any questions.

 

A-Beginners-Guide-To-Off-Grid-Living

Say “So Long!” To The Power Company

If you already own a home that is connected to the grid, your first step will be to have a home energy audit conducted to determine what improvements can be made in order to make your home as energy efficient as possible. The lower your energy demands, the less energy you will have to find a way to generate on a daily basis—all of which translates into saving you as much money as possible in renovation expenses. During this audit, you will want to consider replacing your current appliances with Energy- Star rated alternatives. Bear in mind that some appliances like your water heater have solar-powered options available on the market as well.

 

Once the audit has been conducted and your improvements have been made, analyze just how much power your home needs. With that information, you can then determine how many solar panels and/or wind turbines you will require and can begin making plans to have them installed. As soon as they are ready to go, it’s “so long, power company,” and “hello, free, sustainable power!”

 

Water and Waste

If you truly want to fully divorce your home from the grid, part of that process will entail finding a solution for your water and sewer obligations. Digging a well is an expensive process, and the deeper your well is, the higher the price tag is going to be. You will also want to have your water and soil tested for contaminants before you begin construction to ensure that no toxins are present that can potentially harm your family. As for your septic tank, you’ll want to purchase a tank larger than what your family actually needs. This way, if you ever have guests stay for an extended period of time, your tank will be able to keep up with these higher demands. Like with any serious renovation project, make sure to get an experienced contractor for an expert design.

 

When it comes down to it, living off-grid is not for everyone. It takes hard work and plenty of planning to build and maintain a fully independent, self-sufficient home, so design for the best fit for your lifestyle and your family’s needs. Every step taken is a step in the right direction for yourself and for the planet.

30 Things To Include In Your Camping & Wilderness Survival Pack

This is a great starter list for packing a camping or hiking bag. Many of the items cross over to a survival bug-out bag as well.

Top 30 Essential Tips For Your Camping & Wilderness Survival

Source: GroomNStyle | 30 Things To Include In Your Survival Pack

12 Survival Hygiene Tips for when SHTF

How will you stay clean post-collapse? It’s an issue people don’t give much thought about, yet of crucial importance. Disease is one enemy that can take you down without realizing it, and no amount of tools, gear or survival skills can help.

The people who found refuge on the Louisiana Superdome during Katrina know very well what it’s like. Rotten food, lack of showers and functional toilets, no electricity was hard to endure for the thousands who were crammed into that open space. We need to be prepared, so let’s see some common sense hygiene tips…

#1. Water, water and more water.

Having the means to procure water is the cornerstone of any good hygiene plan. Not just for keeping you hydrated, but also for things like:

  • showering (or, at the very least, to use a damp cloth to wash your body if you don’t have enough of)
  • doing the dishes (though you could stockpile plastic plates and plastic eating utensils to save water)
  • washing clothes
  • cleaning wounds (yes, you could get hurt!)
  • and other things unrelated to hygiene such as watering your garden

Let’s face it, the moment we run out of water, our lives become 10 times more complicated. I’ll even go as far as to say that not having it is way worse than having no electricity.

Ways to ensure you’ve got plenty of water post-collapse:

  • get large, 55-gallon barrels and, if you have a back yard, large water tanks
  • install a rainwater harvesting system
  • have means to filter and purify water in your bug out bag as well as the trunk of your bug out vehicle
  • split your water stockpile between your home and your bug out location, because you never know where you’ll end up
  • keep extra room in the trunk of your bug out vehicle so you can carry extra water with you to your BOL (if there’s time to load it)
  • re-use water from the kitchen sink and shower to water your garden

#2. “If it’s yellow, let it mellow”.

You don’t have to flush the toilet every time. This may not be something you want to do right now but definitely something to keep in mind post-collapse. Follow the “if it’s yellow, let it mellow” rule.

#3. Keep contact with other people to a minimum.

This doesn’t mean you have to stop seeing other people, because you might need information or help. Just remember to avoid touching them, including shaking hands. It may not be polite but manners won’t be as important after the big one hits.

#4. Out of soap or shampoo? Use soapwort!

No, this isn’t some brand of organic soap I’m advertising. Soapwort (lat. saponaria oficinalis) is a perennial plant with beautiful pinkish-violet flowers that can make a great substitute for soap and shampoo. One thing to keep in mind is that it’s “mildly poisonous” if you eat it so only use it externally. There’re plenty of recipes on other sites and the list of ingredients is very short.

#5. Keep dirty clothes contained.

This is especially true if you’re camping somewhere in the woods or if you’re bugging out. All dirty clothes should be stored in plastic bags until you have a chance to wash and dry them.

#6. Show some skin.

The best way to avoid dirty clothes is to avoid wearing them! Now, I’m not sure if the temperature will allow it but if you can, go ahead and do it. One way of getting yourself used to wearing less clothing is to do what I started doing 6 months ago: I stopped wearing pajamas. If you’re older, you should check with your doctor before doing it, but I can tell you it’s working for me.

The benefits? Better immune system, less sweating, your body gets accustomed with lower temperatures (which you might have to face if you’re going to sleep outside) and, best of all, less laundry!

#7. Comb

Combing requires no shampoo and no water, you just have to you remember to add one to your bug out bag. Benefits of combing include removing dandruff, uric acid crystal deposits and other waste. There’s also a side benefit in that you stimulate the blood vessels to bring more blood to your hair, making it stronger and shinier.

#8. No toilet paper? No problem.

There’re plenty of other options that our ancestors used before TP was invented. Things like cloths, newspapers, the leaves of some plants and more.

#9. Remove facial hair.

Though this is an ongoing debate among preppers, you will be less likely to host parasites if you shave your beard and mustache and keep your hair short.

#10. Get a travel sports towel.

If you thought the only way to pack a towel is to sacrifice a good amount of space, I have the solution. There are so-called camp towels that are not only compact but also very absorbent. You can find them on Amazon for around 15 bucks a piece.

#11. Keep your fingernails and toenails neat.

This is very important, as all sorts of bacteria will gather underneath. All you need is nail clippers that you can throw in your bug out bag as part of your hygiene kit.

#12. Take care of your teeth.

Brushing, flossing and using mouthwash should be done DAILY, regardless of whether or not you’re in a disaster situation. Cavities are one of the last things you want to deal with when there’s chaos all around you.

#12. Keep your hands clean.

If you’re doing a lot of office work, you probably don’t feel the need to wash that often. But when you’re working the field and the garden all they, when you’re feeding the animals, fixing your home and doing your own cooking, you’re going to have to wash A LOT more often. You’re also going to need soap (or the means to produce it) and/or hand sanitizer. It’s always a good idea to keep some sanitizer in your BOB and BOV.

Final Word

The thing I hope for the most is that you act on the advice I’ve given you. The tips are easy to put into practice and, some of them should be done on a daily basis, anyway. Post-collapse, you need to be a little more rigorous, so why not start today?

Make Your Own Simple Camp Stove

So, here’s a simple tip to build your own simple camp stove cooking fire.

DIY camp stove/heat from tuna can + cardboard + oil.

DIY camp stove/heat source from trash/scraps: tuna can + cardboard + oil.

It’s simple but effective. Make up a few ahead of your next outdoor adventure and try it for yourself.

“These were fun to make, I used 4 on my last camping trip.”


7 Survival Ideas You Never Thought About 

In reading this article, it brought several new ideas into our own survival research and preps. We recommend you follow the link below as we did.

A collection of seven interesting survival ideas that you can put into practice right now.

Source: 7 Survival Ideas You Never Thought About | Suburban Steader


Does It Really Take $50,000 To Be A Prepper?

 

What Does it Cost to Prepare

Scouring the internet for information on disaster preparedness sheds an interesting light on what most people think it costs to ready themselves for the unexpected. Guides abound on how to prepare with minimal investments – but most put the focus on unreliable foodstuffs, tools, and supplies.

At the opposite end of the spectrum are the complete “how to” guides, that claim to show a family how to prepare for any emergency. These guides tend to indicate that the total cost of preparing a family of four for a natural disaster ranges from $5,000 to over $50,000.

Preparing for the Worst – Not As Expensive As Most Think

Does It Really Take $50,000 To Be A Survival Prepper?

Preparing for a disaster doesn’t mean that you and your family could survive in an underground bunker for thirty years without ever accessing the outside world. It means preparing for the inevitable and unexpected emergencies that can arise at any time.

Disaster preparedness isn’t limited to hurricanes, blizzards, and failures of the national infrastructure. It extends into the smaller disasters that we encounter while going about our everyday lives – like getting stranded in a broken down vehicle in the middle of nowhere, or finding yourself injured while on a hike.

Preparing for these situations is relatively inexpensive. With the help of products like the Bucket Survival Kits it can be incredibly simple, too.




Preparing for Different Types of Emergencies

While the ideal disaster preparedness plan includes provisions for long periods of isolation from modern amenities (such as running water and food supplies), the majority of emergencies the average person will encounter require far less extensive planning.

Breakdown / Stranded Emergencies – If your vehicle were to break down, or if you found yourself stranded in the middle of nowhere, what would you do? With a ready-made kit, like the Guardian Elite (which comes prepared in a sturdy, easy-to-carry back pack) you would have food, and first aid supplies on hand. Toss in a few bottles of water before you head out, and you’ll have that covered, too.

Temporarily Unavailable Food Supplies – Whether it’s a true natural disaster or merely a predicted blizzard, when the newsman warns that rough weather is moving in, everyone rushes to the grocery store and clears the shelves. Having a one month supply of food on hand would ensure that your family doesn’t go hungry, and with kits like the 240 Serving Meal Package, is not only affordable, but incredibly easy to store.

In both of the cases described above, your total investment is going to be far less than what you might expect. Since the kits are ready made and based on government recommendations for preparedness, you can also be sure that they’re relatively complete.

Don’t put off preparing for disaster because you don’t think you can afford it – it’s far less expensive than you think.

Please share your cost saving prepper and survival ideas in the comments below.


Survival Movies: A list of some of our favorite survival related movies of all time.

Year Zero Survival’s favorite movie list:

Panic In Year Zero
The Omega Man
I Am Legend
The Last Man on Earth
The Road
The Day After
28 Days
The Book of Eli
The Edge
Cry In The Wild
Alive
Contagion
127 Hours
Into The Wild
Open Water
Defiance
Red Dawn
The Day After Tomorrow
2012
The Naked Prey
Deep Impact
Flight of The Phoenix

Bonus, our favorite TV survival show:

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